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Unconditional government social cash transfer in Africa does not increase fertility

Author

Listed:
  • Tia Palermo

    () (UNICEF Office of Research—Innocenti)

  • Sudhanshu Handa

    (UNICEF Office of Research—Innocenti
    University of North Carolina)

  • Amber Peterman

    (UNICEF Office of Research—Innocenti)

  • Leah Prencipe

    (UNICEF Office of Research—Innocenti)

  • David Seidenfeld

    (American Institutes for Research (AIR))

Abstract

Abstract Among policymakers, a common perception surrounding the effects of cash transfer programmes, particularly unconditional programmes targeted to families with children, is that they induce increased fertility. We evaluate the Zambian Child Grant Programme, a government unconditional cash transfer targeted to families with a child under the age of 5 and examine impacts on fertility and household composition. The evaluation was a cluster randomized control trial, with data collected over 4 years from 2010 to 2014. Our results indicate that there are no programme impacts on overall fertility. Our results contribute to a small evidence base demonstrating that there are no unintended incentives related to fertility due to cash transfers.

Suggested Citation

  • Tia Palermo & Sudhanshu Handa & Amber Peterman & Leah Prencipe & David Seidenfeld, 2016. "Unconditional government social cash transfer in Africa does not increase fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 1083-1111, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:29:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s00148-016-0596-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-016-0596-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karen Macours & Norbert Schady & Renos Vakis, 2012. "Cash Transfers, Behavioral Changes, and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 247-273, April.
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    8. repec:idb:brikps:publication-detail,7101.html?id=32886 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Karen Macours & Norbert Schady & Renos Vakis, 2012. "Cash Transfers, Behavioral Changes, and Cognitive Development in Early Childhood: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 247-273, April.
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