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Absenteeism, childcare and the effectiveness of pension reforms

Author

Listed:
  • Flavia Coda Moscarola

    () (University of Turin and CeRP-Collegio Carlo Alberto)

  • Elsa Fornero

    () (University of Turin and CeRP-Collegio Carlo Alberto)

  • Steinar Strøm

    () (The Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research)

Abstract

Abstract Both economic and epidemiological literature have shown that perceived high strain at work and lack of social infrastructures are good predictors of sick leave. The latter is particularly relevant in countries where facilities for children and care services are scarce and women are asked to fill the gap. The Italian 2011 pension reform significantly restricted age and seniority requirements for retirement, especially for women in private employment. We investigated whether older Italian employed women reacted to the postponement of retirement by increasing their sick leave. The empirical analysis offers unequivocal evidence that this has indeed been the case, in particular, for low-income grandmothers living in regions with a poor supply of childcare services. Radical reforms risk losing some of their effectiveness if they are not accompanied by parallel measures designed to introduce the welfare provisions previously indirectly and inadequately provided by the pension system, such as care facilities. JEL codes: J26, J13, C33

Suggested Citation

  • Flavia Coda Moscarola & Elsa Fornero & Steinar Strøm, 2016. "Absenteeism, childcare and the effectiveness of pension reforms," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izaels:v:5:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1186_s40174-016-0056-3
    DOI: 10.1186/s40174-016-0056-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Vincenzo Scoppa & Daniela Vuri, 2014. "Absenteeism, unemployment and employment protection legislation: evidence from Italy," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-25, December.
    2. Johansson, Per & Palme, Marten, 1996. "Do economic incentives affect work absence? Empirical evidence using Swedish micro data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 195-218, February.
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    5. Borella, Margherita & Moscarola, Flavia Coda, 2010. "Microsimulation of pension reforms: behavioural versus nonbehavioural approach," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(4), pages 583-607, October.
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    9. Elsa Fornero, 2015. "Economic-financial Literacy and (Sustainable) Pension Reforms: Why the Former is a Key Ingredient for the Latter," Bankers, Markets & Investors, ESKA Publishing, issue 134, pages 6-16, January-F.
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    1. repec:spr:izalpo:v:7:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1186_s40173-018-0103-y is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Serena Trucchi & Elsa Fornero & Mariacristina Rossi, 2018. "Retirement rigidities and the gap between effective and desired labour supply by older workers," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, December.
    3. Bertoni, Marco & Brunello, Giorgio & Mazzarella, Gianluca, 2018. "Does postponing minimum retirement age improve healthy behaviors before retirement? Evidence from middle-aged Italian workers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 215-227.
    4. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-17-00149 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pension reform; Sick leave; Childcare;

    JEL classification:

    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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