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What’s up after brain drain? Sometimes, somewhere, someone comes back: a general model of return migration

  • Alessio Biondo


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    Individual preferences and wage differentials are generally interpreted as determinants of agents’ migration decisions in search of job opportunities. Literature about migration flows usually describes both theoretical and empirical evidence for either temporary or permanent movements of workers, but brain drain migration has its own peculiar characteristics. This paper aims to obtain two results: the first is to present the law of determination that leads to the moment of the return decision, and the second is to analyse how the difference between the utility from domestic and foreign consumption evolves in time. The presented model explains how the return decision is determined, even in cases when the agent does not leave or does not return at all. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2012

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    Article provided by Springer in its journal International Review of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 59 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 269-284

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:inrvec:v:59:y:2012:i:3:p:269-284
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    1. Yusuke Kinari & Fumio Ohtake & Yoshiro Tsutsui, 2009. "Time discounting: Declining impatience and interval effect," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 87-112, August.
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    3. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
    4. Chiswick, Barry R., 2011. "Immigration: High Skilled vs. Low Skilled Labor?," IZA Policy Papers 28, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    9. Borjas, George J & Bratsberg, Bernt, 1996. "Who Leaves? The Outmigration of the Foreign-Born," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 165-76, February.
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    12. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
    13. Alessio Emanuele BIONDO & Simona MONTELEONE, 2010. "Return Migration in Italy:What do we Know?," Journal of Advanced Research in Management, ASERS Publishing, vol. 0(2), pages 94 - 101, December.
    14. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    16. Bell, Brian D, 1997. "The Performance of Immigrants in the United Kingdom: Evidence from the GHS," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(441), pages 333-44, March.
    17. Alejandra Cox Edwards & Manuelita Ureta, 2003. "International Migration, Remittances, and Schooling: Evidence from El Salvador," NBER Working Papers 9766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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