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Mortality in the Visegrad countries from the perspective of socioeconomic inequalities

Author

Listed:
  • Lucia Bosakova

    (P. J. Safarik University in Kosice
    Palacky University in Olomouc)

  • Katarina Rosicova

    (Kosice Self-governing Region)

  • Daniela Filakovska Bobakova

    (P. J. Safarik University in Kosice
    Palacky University in Olomouc)

  • Martin Rosic

    (University of Presov)

  • Dagmar Dzurova

    (Charles University)

  • Hynek Pikhart

    (University College London)

  • Michala Lustigova

    (Charles University)

  • Paula Santana

    (University of Coimbra
    University of Coimbra)

Abstract

Objectives Large socioeconomic inequalities in health are still present in the Central Europe. The aim was to explore socioeconomic inequalities in mortality in Visegrad countries—the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia (V4), by three different socioeconomic indicators (unemployment, risk of poverty/social exclusion, education). The study was conducted within the H2020 Euro-Healthy project. Methods The associations between selected socioeconomic indicators and the standardised mortality rates by four main causes (mortality related to cancer, circulatory, respiratory and digestive system) in the economically active population aged 20–64 years in the 35 NUTS 2 level regions of the V4 in the period 2011–2013 were explored, using linear regression models. Results Lower education level was the most significant predictor of mortality in the V4. The lowest mortality rates by all causes of death were found in the regions of the Czech Republic, the highest in regions of Hungary. Conclusions Despite the common origin, the pathways of the V4 countries in employment, poverty and education seem to be different, also having impact on health equity. Therefore, where you live in the V4 can significantly influence your health.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucia Bosakova & Katarina Rosicova & Daniela Filakovska Bobakova & Martin Rosic & Dagmar Dzurova & Hynek Pikhart & Michala Lustigova & Paula Santana, 2019. "Mortality in the Visegrad countries from the perspective of socioeconomic inequalities," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 64(3), pages 365-376, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:64:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s00038-018-1183-6
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-018-1183-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lucia Bosakova & Andrea Madarasova Geckova & Jitse P. van Dijk & Sijmen A. Reijneveld, 2020. "School is (not) calling: the associations of gender, family affluence, disruptions in the social context and learning difficulties with school satisfaction among adolescents in Slovakia," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 65(8), pages 1413-1421, November.
    2. Jutz, Regina, 2020. "Health inequalities in Eastern Europe. Does the role of the welfare regime differ from Western Europe?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 267(C).

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