IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/ijphth/v58y2013i6p811-823.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Changing patterns of mortality in 25 European countries and their economic and political correlates, 1955–1989

Author

Listed:
  • Johan Mackenbach

    ()

  • Caspar Looman

Abstract

Although this was a politically stable period, mortality patterns were highly dynamic, and prefigured the more dramatic mortality trends after 1990. Economic and political stagnation probably explains the diverging trends in Central and Eastern Europe. Copyright Swiss School of Public Health 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Johan Mackenbach & Caspar Looman, 2013. "Changing patterns of mortality in 25 European countries and their economic and political correlates, 1955–1989," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 58(6), pages 811-823, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:58:y:2013:i:6:p:811-823
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-013-0509-7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00038-013-0509-7
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson & Pierre Yared, 2008. "Income and Democracy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(3), pages 808-842, June.
    2. Klomp, Jeroen & de Haan, Jakob, 2009. "Is the political system really related to health?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 36-46, July.
    3. repec:cup:apsrev:v:53:y:1959:i:01:p:69-105_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Robyn Swift, 2011. "The relationship between health and GDP in OECD countries in the very long run," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 306-322, March.
    5. Timothy Besley & Masayuki Kudamatsu, 2006. "Health and Democracy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 313-318, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tomoyuki Kawada, 2014. "The difference between healthy life expectancy and life expectancy at birth in men is smaller than that in women in populations with high life expectancy," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(2), pages 423-424, April.
    2. Johan Fritzell & Johan Rehnberg & Jennie Bacchus Hertzman & Jenni Blomgren, 2015. "Absolute or relative? A comparative analysis of the relationship between poverty and mortality," LIS Working papers 637, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    3. Johan Fritzell & Johan Rehnberg & Jennie Bacchus Hertzman & Jenni Blomgren, 2015. "Absolute or relative? A comparative analysis of the relationship between poverty and mortality," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(1), pages 101-110, January.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:58:y:2013:i:6:p:811-823. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.