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The difference between healthy life expectancy and life expectancy at birth in men is smaller than that in women in populations with high life expectancy

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  • Tomoyuki Kawada

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  • Tomoyuki Kawada, 2014. "The difference between healthy life expectancy and life expectancy at birth in men is smaller than that in women in populations with high life expectancy," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 59(2), pages 423-424, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:59:y:2014:i:2:p:423-424
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-013-0533-7
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00038-013-0533-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Johan Mackenbach & Caspar Looman, 2013. "Changing patterns of mortality in 25 European countries and their economic and political correlates, 1955–1989," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 58(6), pages 811-823, December.
    2. Herman Oyen & Wilma Nusselder & Carol Jagger & Petra Kolip & Emmanuelle Cambois & Jean-Marie Robine, 2013. "Gender differences in healthy life years within the EU: an exploration of the “health–survival” paradox," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 58(1), pages 143-155, February.
    3. Seeromanie Harding & Erik Lenguerrand & Giuseppe Costa & Angelo d’Errico & Pekka Martikainen & Lasse Tarkiainen & David Blane & Bola Akinwale & Melanie Bartley, 2013. "Trends in mortality by labour market position around retirement ages in three European countries with different welfare regimes," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 58(1), pages 99-108, February.
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