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Harmful drinking after job loss: a stronger association during the post-2008 economic crisis?

Author

Listed:
  • Moniek C. M. Goeij

    (University of Amsterdam)

  • Jan-Willem Bruggink

    (Statistics Netherlands)

  • Ferdy Otten

    (Statistics Netherlands)

  • Anton E. Kunst

    () (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

Objectives This study investigated, among the Dutch working population, whether job loss during the post-2008 economic crisis is associated with harmful drinking and whether this association is stronger than before the crisis. Methods Repeated cross-sectional data from the Dutch Health Interview Survey 2004–2013 were used to define episodic drinking (≥6 glasses on 1 day ≥1/week) and chronic drinking (≥14 glasses/week for women and ≥21 for men). These data were linked to longitudinal data from tax registries, to measure the experience and duration of job loss during a 5-year working history. Results Before the crisis, job loss experience and duration were not associated with harmful drinking. During the crisis, job loss for more than 6 months was associated with episodic drinking [OR 1.40 (95% CI 1.01; 1.94)], while current job loss was associated with chronic drinking [OR 1.43 (95% CI 1.03; 1.98)]. These associations were most clear in men and different between the pre-crisis and crisis period (p interaction = 0.023 and 0.035, respectively). Conclusions The results suggest that economic crises strengthen the potential impact of job loss on harmful drinking, predominately among men.

Suggested Citation

  • Moniek C. M. Goeij & Jan-Willem Bruggink & Ferdy Otten & Anton E. Kunst, 2017. "Harmful drinking after job loss: a stronger association during the post-2008 economic crisis?," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 62(5), pages 563-572, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:62:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s00038-016-0936-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-016-0936-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Alcohol; Drinking; Economic crisis; Job loss; Sex;

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