IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/fosoec/v38y2009i2p209-228.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Teaching Keynes’s Principle of Effective Demand within the Real Wage vs. Employment Space

Author

Listed:
  • Corrado Andini

    ()

Abstract

This paper reviews several models for teaching Keynes’s principle of effective demand with a special focus on a framework that is familiar to advanced undergraduate students of macroeconomics: the real wage vs. employment space. It is argued that existing approaches to teaching Keynes’s principle of effective demand reflect a tension between two goals: being true to Keynes and translating the effective-demand principle into a story about real wages and employment within a single graphical space. Our main contribution consists of presenting an extended version of a model originally proposed by Lavoie (Rev Radic Polit Econ, 35(2):166--182, 2003), which seems to be a reasonable compromise between these two goals.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Corrado Andini, 2009. "Teaching Keynes’s Principle of Effective Demand within the Real Wage vs. Employment Space," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 38(2), pages 209-228, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:fosoec:v:38:y:2009:i:2:p:209-228
    DOI: 10.1007/s12143-009-9035-z
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12143-009-9035-z
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Davidson, 1983. "The Marginal Product Curve Is Not the Demand Curve for Labor and Lucas’s Labor Supply Function Is Not the Supply Curve for Labor in the Real World," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 105-117, September.
    2. J.E. King, 2005. "Unwarping the record: a reply to Paul Davidson," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 377-384.
    3. Marc Lavoie, 2005. "Changing definitions: a comment on Davidson's critique of King's history of Post Keynesianism," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 371-376.
    4. Davidson, Paul, 1998. "Post Keynesian Employment Analysis and the Macroeconomics of OECD Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(448), pages 817-831, May.
    5. Roger E. A. Farmer, 2008. "Aggregate demand and supply," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 4(1), pages 77-93, March.
    6. Janet T. Knoedler & Daniel A. Underwood, 2003. "Teaching the Principles of Economics: A Proposal for a Multi-paradigmatic Approach," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(3), pages 697-725, September.
    7. Harris, Donald J, 1974. "The Price Policy of Firms, the Level of Employment and Distribution of Income in the Short Run," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(22), pages 144-151, June.
    8. Barro, Robert J & Grossman, Herschel I, 1971. "A General Disequilibrium Model of Income and Employment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(1), pages 82-93, March.
    9. Paul Dalziel & Marc Lavoie, 2003. "Teaching Keynes's Principle of Effective Demand Using the Aggregate Labor Market Diagram," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(4), pages 333-340, December.
    10. Paul Davidson, 2005. "Responses to Lavoie, King, and Dow on what Post Keynesianism is and who is a Post Keynesian," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 393-408.
    11. Kniesner, Thomas J & Goldsmith, Arthur H, 1987. "A Survey of Alternative Models of the Aggregate U.S. Labor Market," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 1241-1280, September.
    12. A. Asimakopulos, 1975. "A Kaleckian Theory of Income Distribution," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 8(3), pages 313-333, August.
    13. Marc Lavoie, 2003. "Real Wages and Unemployment with Effective and Notional Demand for Labor," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 35(2), pages 166-182, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Kemp-Benedict, Eric, 2014. "The inverted pyramid: A neo-Ricardian view on the economy–environment relationship," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 230-241.
    2. Pascal Michaillat & Emmanuel Saez, 2015. "Aggregate Demand, Idle Time, and Unemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 130(2), pages 507-569.
    3. Michaillat, Pascal & Saez, Emmanuel, 2013. "A model of aggregate demand and unemployment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51579, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Schoder, Christian, 2020. "A Keynesian Dynamic Stochastic Disequilibrium model for business cycle analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 117-132.
    5. Roger E.A. Farmer, 2017. "Post-Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium theory," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 14(2), pages 173-185, September.
    6. Mark Setterfield & Yun K. Kim & Jeremy Rees, 2016. "Inequality, Debt Servicing and the Sustainability of Steady State Growth," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(1), pages 45-63, January.
    7. Christian Schoder, 2017. "An estimated Dynamic Stochastic Disequilibrium model of Euro-Area unemployment," Working Papers 1725, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    8. Robert A. Blecker, 2016. "Wage-led versus profit-led demand regimes: the long and the short of it," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 4(4), pages 373-390, October.
    9. Setterfield, Mark & Kim, Yun K., 2016. "Debt servicing, aggregate consumption, and growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 22-33.
    10. Yun K. Kim & Gilberto Tadeu Lima & Mark Setterfield, 2017. "Political Aspects of Household Debt," Working Papers 1724, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    11. Yun K. Kim & Alan G. Isaac, 2017. "Firms’ Retention Behavior, Debt, and Macroeconomic Dynamics," Working Papers 2017_04, University of Massachusetts Boston, Economics Department.
    12. Pannone, Andrea, 2010. "Production, unemployment and wage flexibility in an ICT-assisted economy: A model," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 219-230, August.
    13. Hein, Eckhard & Prante, Franz, 2018. "Functional distribution and wage inequality in recent Kaleckian growth models," IPE Working Papers 110/2018, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    14. Thomas Goda, 2017. "A comparative review of the role of income inequality in economic crisis theories and its contribution to the financial crisis of 2007-2009," Revista Finanzas y Politica Economica, Universidad Católica de Colombia, vol. 9(1), pages 151-174, February.
    15. Thomas Goda, 2013. "The role of income inequality in crisis theories and in the subprime crisis," Working Papers PKWP1305, Post Keynesian Economics Society (PKES).
    16. J. E. King, 2012. "Post Keynesians and Others," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 305-319, April.
    17. León Díaz, John Jairo, 2007. "Keynesianismo, Poskeynesianismo y Nuevokeynesianismo: ¿Tres doctrinas diferentes y una sóla teoría verdadera? [Keynesianism, PostKeynesianism and Newkeynesianism: ¿Three different doctrines just on," MPRA Paper 4600, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2007.
    18. Christian Schoder, 2017. "A Keynesian Dynamic Stochastic Disequilibrium model for business cycle analysis," Working Papers 1701, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    19. Jonathan Heathcote & Fabrizio Perri, 2018. "Wealth and Volatility," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 85(4), pages 2173-2213.
    20. D. Patinkin, 1995. "The training of an economist," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 48(195), pages 359-395.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:fosoec:v:38:y:2009:i:2:p:209-228. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.