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Individual and institutional determinants of corruption in the EU countries: the problem of its tolerance

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  • Jan Hunady

    () (Matej Bel University in Banska Bystrica)

Abstract

This paper deals with the problem of corruption, with a focus on both individual and country-specific institutional factors that may affect this problem. We analyse the determinants of the incidence of corruption as well as the tolerance of corruption. We used logit regressions that utilised data derived from Eurobarometer. The results strongly suggest gender, age, and education are important factors. We may say that anti-corruption policy ought to be targeted towards younger, less-educated, self-employed people with no children. On the other hand, a better-educated man in his early 30s seems to be a typical victim of corruption. The same is true for those having problems paying their expenses. Furthermore, contact with public officials appears to be one of the key issues, with Internet-based interactions with the government perhaps serving as the most effective solution to this problem. The rule of law, government effectiveness, and public accountability seem to be other factors that negatively correlate with the level of corruption within a country.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Hunady, 2017. "Individual and institutional determinants of corruption in the EU countries: the problem of its tolerance," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 34(1), pages 139-157, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:epolit:v:34:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s40888-017-0056-4
    DOI: 10.1007/s40888-017-0056-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Katarína Melichová & Lukáš Varecha, 2020. "Endogenous Political, Institutional, Cultural, and Geographic Determinants of Intermunicipal Cooperation—Evidence from Slovakia," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(2), pages 1-25, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tolerance of corruption; Determinants of corruption; Institutional factors; Public policy;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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