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Green economy priority sectors in Indonesia: a SAM approach

Author

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  • Lilia Endriana

    ()

  • Djoni Hartono

    ()

  • Tony Irawan

    ()

Abstract

Green economy has been offered as an innovative initiative to achieve a sustainable development. This framework covers three important aspects, namely economic, environmental, and social aspect. This paper aims to identify sectors that satisfy all three criteria of a green economy framework. Those sectors must have high multiplier effect on the economy, have a relatively low CO 2 emissions and better income distribution. Technically, the paper develops Indonesian energy social accounting matrix and calculates three indicators in order to identify green economy priority sectors. Those indicators are output multiplier index, emissions multiplier index, and Theil index. The results suggest 11 sectors that satisfy all three aspects of green economy. Copyright Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies and Springer Japan 2016

Suggested Citation

  • Lilia Endriana & Djoni Hartono & Tony Irawan, 2016. "Green economy priority sectors in Indonesia: a SAM approach," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 18(1), pages 115-135, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:envpol:v:18:y:2016:i:1:p:115-135
    DOI: 10.1007/s10018-015-0114-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Green economy; SAM; CO 2 emissions; Income distribution; Q51; Q56; O15;

    JEL classification:

    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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