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The impact of household consumption patterns on emissions in Spain

  • Duarte, Rosa
  • Mainar, Alfredo
  • Sánchez-Chóliz, Julio

The aim of this paper is to analyse the relationship between household consumption patterns and pollution in the Spanish economy. The analysis was carried using a Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) for the Spanish economy prepared for 1999. Taking the final demand of households as the exogenous account in the SAM framework and combining this with the information provided by the Household Budget Continuous Survey on income and consumption (INE, 1999), we analyse the pollution produced by both the economy and households in order to satisfy consumption requirements. We also consider the effects of income inequality on expenditure levels, establishing a link between income level, consumption patterns, propensity to consume and CO2 emissions.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 176-185

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Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:1:p:176-185
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco

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