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Environmental policy and profitability: evidence from Swedish industry


  • Runar Brännlund
  • Tommy Lundgren


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Suggested Citation

  • Runar Brännlund & Tommy Lundgren, 2010. "Environmental policy and profitability: evidence from Swedish industry," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 12(1), pages 59-78, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:envpol:v:12:y:2010:i:1:p:59-78
    DOI: 10.1007/s10018-010-0163-8

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Paul Lanoie & Michel Patry & Richard Lajeunesse, 2008. "Environmental regulation and productivity: testing the porter hypothesis," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 121-128, October.
    2. J.B. Smith & W A. Sims, 1985. "The Impact of Pollution Charges on Productivity Growth in Canadian Brewing," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 16(3), pages 410-423, Autumn.
    3. Gray, Wayne B. & Shadbegian, Ronald J., 2003. "Plant vintage, technology, and environmental regulation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 384-402, November.
    4. Feichtinger, Gustav & Hartl, Richard F. & Kort, Peter M. & Veliov, Vladimir M., 2005. "Environmental policy, the porter hypothesis and the composition of capital: Effects of learning and technological progress," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 434-446, September.
    5. Henrik Hammar & Tommy Lundgren & Magnus Sjostrom & Matts Andersson, 2011. "The kilometer tax and Swedish industry-effects on sectors and regions," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(22), pages 2907-2917.
    6. Adam B. Jaffe & Karen Palmer, 1997. "Environmental Regulation And Innovation: A Panel Data Study," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 610-619, November.
    7. Ebru Alpay & Joe Kerkvliet & Steven Buccola, 2002. "Productivity Growth and Environmental Regulation in Mexican and U.S. Food Manufacturing," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(4), pages 887-901.
    8. Mohr, Robert D., 2002. "Technical Change, External Economies, and the Porter Hypothesis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 158-168, January.
    9. David Popp, 2002. "Induced Innovation and Energy Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 160-180, March.
    10. Shunsuke Managi & SJames J. Opaluch & Di Jin & Thomas A. Grigalunas, 2005. "Environmental Regulations and Technological Change in the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(2).
    11. Hammar, Henrik & Lundgren, Tommy & Sjöström, Magnus, 2006. "The significance of transport costs in the Swedish forest industry," Working Papers 97, National Institute of Economic Research.
    12. Cole Matthew A & Elliott Rob J, 2007. "Do Environmental Regulations Cost Jobs? An Industry-Level Analysis of the UK," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-27, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00181-016-1180-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Stöver, Jana & Weche, John P., 2015. "Environmental regulation and sustainable competitiveness: Evaluating the role of firm-level green investments in the context of the Porter hypothesis," HWWI Research Papers 170, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    3. Bostian, Moriah & Färe, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Lundgren, Tommy & Weber, William L., 2016. "Time substitution for environmental performance: The case of Sweden manufacturing," CERE Working Papers 2016:3, CERE - the Center for Environmental and Resource Economics.
    4. Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy & Marklund, Per-Olov, 2014. "Carbon intensity in production and the effects of climate policy—Evidence from Swedish industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 844-857.
    5. Bostian, Moriah & Färe, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Lundgren, Tommy, 2016. "Environmental investment and firm performance: A network approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 243-255.
    6. Karimu, Amin & Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy & Söderholm, Patrik, 2017. "Energy intensity and convergence in Swedish industry: A combined econometric and decomposition analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 347-356.
    7. Zhang, Shanshan & Lundgren, Tommy & Zhou, Wenchao, 2016. "Energy efficiency in Swedish industry," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 42-51.
    8. Nikos Chatzistamoulou & George Diagourtas & Kostas Kounetas, 2017. "Do pollution abatement expenditures lead to higher productivity growth? Evidence from Greek manufacturing industries," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 19(1), pages 15-34, January.
    9. repec:spr:envpol:v:20:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10018-017-0182-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Sebastian Miller & Mauricio Vela, 2013. "Are Environmentally Related Taxes Effective?," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-467, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.


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