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Major influences on circus attendance

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  • Roberto Zanola

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Abstract

Although circus represents one of the most accessible art forms, the economics of the arts and culture has completely neglected to address this topic. This paper represents an attempt to fill in this lack by identifying the determinants of the demand for circus in Italy, both in terms of structural characteristics of the shows and socio-economic factors that impact on it. To this aim, we collect information on the tournee of the bigger circuses performing in Italy during 2005 and 2006. The results show a positive elasticity of demand to income and, differently from similar studies on performing arts, to ticket price. There also differences between circuses in the importance of numbers with animals.
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Suggested Citation

  • Roberto Zanola, 2010. "Major influences on circus attendance," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 159-170, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:38:y:2010:i:1:p:159-170
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-009-0260-3
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00181-009-0260-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Ralf Dewenter & Michael Westermann, 2005. "Cinema Demand In Germany," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(3), pages 213-231, August.
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    8. Daniel Urrutiaguer, 2002. "Quality Judgements and Demand for French Public Theatre," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 26(3), pages 185-202, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefania Ottone & Ferruccio Ponzano, 2011. "How people perceive the Welfare State: a real-effort experiment," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 58(2), pages 165-183, June.
    2. Roberto Zanola, 2010. "Who likes circus animals?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(4), pages 3315-3320.
    3. Privileggi, Fabio, 2007. "The cutoff policy of taxation when CRRA taxpayers differ in risk aversion coefficients and income: a proof," POLIS Working Papers 99, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
    4. Davide Ticchi & Andrea Vindigni, 2007. "War and Endogenous Democracy," Working Papers 0715, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Department of Economics, Society & Politics - Scientific Committee - L. Stefanini & G. Travaglini, revised 2007.
    5. Victor Fernandez-Blanco & Luis Orea & Juan Prieto-Rodriguez, 2013. "Endogeneity and measurement errors when estimating demand functions with average prices: an example from the movie market," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 1477-1496, June.
    6. Daron Acemoglu & Davide Ticchi & Andrea Vindigni, 2010. "A Theory of Military Dictatorships," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 1-42, January.
    7. Marchese, Carla, 2008. "The limits to growth then and now," POLIS Working Papers 105, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
    8. Montefiori, Marcello & Resta, Marina, 2008. "Social influence and neighbourhood effects in the health care market," POLIS Working Papers 98, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
    9. Ottone, Stefania & Ponzano, Ferruccio, 2007. "Non-self-centered inequity aversion matters. A model," POLIS Working Papers 91, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
    10. Zanola, Roberto, 2008. "Consumer preferences for circus: A cluster approach," POLIS Working Papers 109, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Circus; Demand; Performing arts; Italy; Attendance; C2; D2; Z1;

    JEL classification:

    • C2 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables
    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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