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Floods and Household Welfare: Evidence from Southeast Asia

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  • Thi Ngoc Tu Le

    (University of Göttingen
    Hoa Sen University)

Abstract

This research uses a rich panel data set of household surveys and external long-term flood data, extracted from satellite images, to complete a puzzling picture of the effects of floods on household welfare. Floods impose a mixed impact on households. On the one hand, the floods reduce household incomes dependent on natural sources; while on the other hand, floods push farmers out of the fields to seek extra incomes from non-agricultural activities. In addition, the floods significantly increase some types of expenditure. The finding of a lower household subjective wellbeing score reaffirms all these results. Further, this research shows the efforts that rural households are making to cope with the effects of flooding. They employ both formal and informal coping mechanisms; however, only financial remittances are shown to be significantly effective in providing relief.

Suggested Citation

  • Thi Ngoc Tu Le, 2020. "Floods and Household Welfare: Evidence from Southeast Asia," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 145-170, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ediscc:v:4:y:2020:i:1:d:10.1007_s41885-019-00055-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s41885-019-00055-x
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    Cited by:

    1. Mai Quynh Vu & Thao Thi Phuong Tran & Thao Anh Hoang & Long Quynh Khuong & Minh Van Hoang, 2020. "Health-related quality of life of the Vietnamese during the COVID-19 pandemic," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(12), pages 1-15, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Flood impacts; Welfare impacts; Income impacts; Consumption impacts; Geographic information systems (GIS); MODIS images; MSC: 91B76.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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