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Do good institutions improve fiscal transparency?

Author

Listed:
  • Nicoló Andreula

    (McKinsey & Company)

  • Alberto Chong

    () (Georgia State University
    Universidad del Pacifico)

Abstract

Abstract We study the role of institutional quality on the fiscal transparency of a country. We show that such a link does exist even when controlling for endogeneity. Our findings are robust to changes in specification and a host of transparency sub-measures. An advantage of our study is that we use new data on fiscal transparency for a cross-section of 82 countries, which are based on in-depth reports based on a standardized methodology and protocol. Furthermore, the fiscal measures were obtained with the collaboration of government authorities, which makes them particularly reliable.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicoló Andreula & Alberto Chong, 2016. "Do good institutions improve fiscal transparency?," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 241-263, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ecogov:v:17:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s10101-015-0175-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s10101-015-0175-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    14. James E. Alt & David Dreyer Lassen & Shanna Rose, 2006. "The Causes of Fiscal Transparency: Evidence from the American States," EPRU Working Paper Series 06-02, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
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    1. repec:eee:jebusi:v:96:y:2018:i:c:p:42-58 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Fiscal; Transparency; Institutions; Cross-country;

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