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Who Coresides With Parents? An Analysis Based on Sibling Comparative Advantage

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  • Sen Ma

    () (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

  • Fangqi Wen

    (New York University)

Abstract

Abstract Coresidence between elderly parents and their married adult children is common in East Asian societies. We analyze theoretically and empirically with which adult child parents coreside when the extended family has multiple adult children, and we show that this decision-making process can be rationalized. Specifically, we find evidence that suggests division of labor among family members through the choice of coresidence. Theoretically, we show that when parents can help children with housework, they will coreside with higher-educated children whose opportunity cost of housework is higher. On the other hand, when parents need help from children in housework labor, they will coreside with lower-educated children, whose opportunity cost of housework is lower. By adopting a data set containing information on parents and their married adult children, we find that our two hypotheses are supported among families from rural China. The probability of coresidence is positively associated with relative education of the children when parents can provide help but negatively associated with education when parents need help.

Suggested Citation

  • Sen Ma & Fangqi Wen, 2016. "Who Coresides With Parents? An Analysis Based on Sibling Comparative Advantage," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 623-647, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:53:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s13524-016-0468-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-016-0468-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Landmann, Andreas & Seitz, Helke & Steiner, Susan, 2017. "Patrilocal Residence and Female Labour Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 10890, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Andreas Landmann & Helke Seitz & Susan Steiner, 2017. "Patrilocal Residence and Female Labour Supply," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1705, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Landmann, Andreas & Seitz, Helke & Steiner, Susan, 2017. "Intergenerational Coresidence and Female Labour Supply," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168282, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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