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Demographic Conditions Responsible for Population Aging


  • Samuel Preston
  • Christine Himes
  • Mitchell Eggers


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Samuel Preston & Christine Himes & Mitchell Eggers, 1989. "Demographic Conditions Responsible for Population Aging," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(4), pages 691-704, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:26:y:1989:i:4:p:691-704
    DOI: 10.2307/2061266

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Shiro Horiuchi & Samuel Preston, 1988. "Age-specific growth rates: The legacy of past population dynamics," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 25(3), pages 429-441, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlo Maccheroni, 2016. "The Actuarial Aging of Italian Veterans of World War I Born 1889-1901 and a Comparison to the Cohorts Born During the Years Immediately Following," Working papers 036, Department of Economics and Statistics (Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-Sociali e Matematico-Statistiche), University of Torino.
    2. James W. Vaupel & Zhen Zhang, 2012. "The difference between alternative averages," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(15), pages 419-428, September.
    3. Henseke, Golo & Tivig, Thusnelda, 2013. "Alterung in Berufen: Der Beitrag ökonomischer Einflüsse," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80001, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. James W. Vaupel & Vladimir Canudas-Romo, 2002. "Decomposing demographic change into direct vs. compositional components," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(1), pages 1-14, July.
    5. Janssen, Fanny & Kunst, Anton E. & Mackenbach, Johan P., 2006. "Association between gross domestic product throughout the life course and old-age mortality across birth cohorts: Parallel analyses of seven European countries, 1950-1999," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 239-254, July.
    6. Henseke, Golo & Strohner, Benjamin & Tivig, Thusnelda, 2013. "Methodenreport Work & Age: Berufliche Alterungstrends und Fachkräfteengpässe," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 130, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
    7. Carl P. Schmertmann & T. J. Mathews & Charles B. Nam, 1994. "Demographic Influences On The Number Of Children At School Entry Ages, With Examples From Three States," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 24(2), pages 177-194, Fall.
    8. Weizsäcker, Robert K. von, 1995. "Does an Aging Population Increase Inequality?," Discussion Papers 535, Institut fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre und Statistik, Abteilung fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre.
    9. von Weizsacker, Robert K., 1996. "Distributive implications of an aging society," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 729-746, April.

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