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The timing of falls into poverty after retirement and widowhood

Author

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  • Karen Holden
  • Richard Burkhauser
  • Daniel Feaster

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Suggested Citation

  • Karen Holden & Richard Burkhauser & Daniel Feaster, 1988. "The timing of falls into poverty after retirement and widowhood," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 25(3), pages 405-414, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:25:y:1988:i:3:p:405-414
    DOI: 10.2307/2061540
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lazear, Edward P & Michael, Robert T, 1980. "Family Size and the Distribution of Real Per Capita Income," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(1), pages 91-107, March.
    2. Burkhauser, Richard V & Wilkinson, James T, 1983. "The Effect of Retirement on Income Distribution: A Comprehensive Income Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(4), pages 653-658, November.
    3. Richard Burkhauser & Karen Holden & Daniel Myers, 1986. "Marital disruption and poverty: The role of survey procedures in artificially creating poverty," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 23(4), pages 621-631, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexandra Spicer & Olena Stavrunova & Susan Thorp, 2016. "How Portfolios Evolve after Retirement: Evidence from Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(297), pages 241-267, June.
    2. Cherchye, Laurens & De Rock, Bram & Vermeulen, Frederic, 2012. "Economic well-being and poverty among the elderly: An analysis based on a collective consumption model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 985-1000.
    3. Michael D. Hurd, 1994. "The Economic Status of the Elderly in the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Aging in the United States and Japan: Economic Trends, pages 63-84 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Michael D. Hurd & David A. Wise, 1996. "Changing Social Security Survivorship Benefits and the Poverty of Widows," NBER Chapters,in: The Economic Effects of Aging in the United States and Japan, pages 319-332 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Jessie Fan & Cathleen Zick, 2006. "Expenditure Flows Near Widowhood," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 335-353, June.
    6. Felix B├╝chel & Joachim R. Frick & Asghar Zaidi, 2004. "Income Mobility in Old Age in Britain and Germany," CASE Papers 089, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    7. Michael D. Hurd, 1989. "Issues and Results from Research on the Elderly I: Economic Status (Part I of III Parts)," NBER Working Papers 3018, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Thomas L. Hungerford, 2002. "The Persistence of Hardship Over the Life Course," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_367, Levy Economics Institute.
    9. David R. Weir & Robert J. Willis & Purvi A. Sevak, 2002. "The Economic Consequences of Widowhood," Working Papers wp023, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    10. K. C. Holden & S. Nicholson, "undated". "Selection of a Joint-and-Survivor Pension," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1175-98, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

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