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Trend and variation in the seasonality of U.S. fertility, 1947–1976


  • Daniel Seiver


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Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Seiver, 1985. "Trend and variation in the seasonality of U.S. fertility, 1947–1976," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(1), pages 89-100, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:22:y:1985:i:1:p:89-100
    DOI: 10.2307/2060988

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. J. Udry & Naomi Morris, 1967. "Seasonality of coitus and seasonality of birth," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 4(2), pages 673-679, June.
    2. Saxonhouse, Gary R, 1976. "Estimated Parameters as Dependent Variables," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(1), pages 178-183, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joshua Wilde & Benedicte Apouey & Toni Jung, 2014. "Heat Waves at Conception and Later Life Outcomes," Working Papers 0514, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
    2. Kasey S. Buckles & Daniel M. Hungerman, 2013. "Season of Birth and Later Outcomes: Old Questions, New Answers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(3), pages 711-724, July.
    3. David Lam & Jeffrey Miron, 1996. "The effects of temperature on human fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(3), pages 291-305, August.
    4. Janice Compton & Lindsay M. Tedds, 2016. "Effects of the 2001 Extension of Paid Parental Leave Provisions on Birth Seasonality in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 42(1), pages 65-82, March.
    5. David Lam & Jeffrey Miron & Ann Riley, 1994. "Modeling Seasonality in Fecundability, Conceptions, and Births," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(2), pages 321-346, May.
    6. Laura Birg & Anna Goeddeke, 2016. "Christmas Economics—A Sleigh Ride," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(4), pages 1980-1984, October.
    7. Joseph Rodgers & Craig John & Ronnie Coleman, 2005. "Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(4), pages 675-692, November.
    8. repec:eee:eecrev:v:97:y:2017:i:c:p:87-107 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Wilde, Joshua & Apouey, Bénédicte H. & Jung, Toni, 2017. "The effect of ambient temperature shocks during conception and early pregnancy on later life outcomes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 87-107.

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