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The effects of temperature on human fertility

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Listed:
  • David Lam

    ()

  • Jeffrey Miron

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • David Lam & Jeffrey Miron, 1996. "The effects of temperature on human fertility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(3), pages 291-305, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:33:y:1996:i:3:p:291-305
    DOI: 10.2307/2061762
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/2061762
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel Seiver, 1985. "Trend and variation in the seasonality of U.S. fertility, 1947–1976," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(1), pages 89-100, February.
    2. David Lam & Jeffrey Miron & Ann Riley, 1994. "Modeling Seasonality in Fecundability, Conceptions, and Births," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(2), pages 321-346, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Cinnirella & Marc Klemp & Jacob Weisdorf, 2017. "Malthus in the Bedroom: Birth Spacing as Birth Control in Pre-Transition England," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 413-436, April.
    2. Kasey S. Buckles & Daniel M. Hungerman, 2013. "Season of Birth and Later Outcomes: Old Questions, New Answers," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(3), pages 711-724, July.
    3. Stacy Dickert-Conlin & Amitabh Chandra, 1999. "Taxes and the Timing of Birth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(1), pages 161-177, February.
    4. repec:eee:eecrev:v:97:y:2017:i:c:p:87-107 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:iza:izawol:journl:2017:n:375 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Wilde, Joshua & Apouey, Bénédicte H. & Jung, Toni, 2017. "The effect of ambient temperature shocks during conception and early pregnancy on later life outcomes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 87-107.
    7. Bladimir Carrillo Bermudez & João Eustáquio De Lima & Juan C. Trujillo, 2016. "Weather Fluctuations, Early-Life Conditions, And Parental Investments: Evidence From Colombia," Anais do XLIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 43rd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 140, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    8. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s13524-018-0690-7 is not listed on IDEAS

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