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Potential and limitations of bioenergy for low carbon transitions

  • Ruben Bibas


  • Aurélie Méjean

Sustaining low CO 2 emissions pathways to 2100 may rely on electricity production from biomass. We analyze the economic effect of the availability of biomass resources and technologies with and without CCS within a general equilibrium framework. We assess the robustness of bioenergy with and without CCS for reaching the RCP 3.7 target with the hybrid model Imaclim-R. Global consumption is affected by the absence of CCS or biomass options, and biomass is shown to be a possible technological answer to the absence of CCS. As the use of biomass on a large scale might prove unsustainable, we show that early action is a strategy to reduce the need for biomass and enhance economic growth in the long term. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

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Article provided by Springer in its journal Climatic Change.

Volume (Year): 123 (2014)
Issue (Month): 3 (April)
Pages: 731-761

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Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:123:y:2014:i:3:p:731-761
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