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Trading Real-World Assets on Blockchain

Author

Listed:
  • Benedikt Notheisen

    () (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology)

  • Jacob Benjamin Cholewa

    () (IT University of Copenhagen)

  • Arun Prasad Shanmugam

    () (IT University of Copenhagen)

Abstract

Abstract Since its introduction in 2008, blockchain technology has outgrown its use in cryptocurrencies and is now preparing to revolutionize a multitude of commercial applications including value and supply chains, business models, and market structures. This work follows design science research to guide the implementation of a blockchain-based proof-of-concept prototype that enables the automated transaction of real-world assets, such as cars, and provides a valid, transparent, and immutable record of vehicle history to market participants, authorities, and other third parties. The contribution of this study to existing research is threefold: First, it introduces a built-in mechanism to reduce transaction risk resulting from the irreversibility of transactions in blockchain-based systems. Second, it replaces a trust-based, centralized, and bureaucratic register with a tamper-free and autonomous transactional database system that comprises a secure registration and transaction process. Third, it proposes a novel approach to mitigate adverse selection effects in lemon markets by providing a reliable, transparent, and complete record of each marketable asset’s history. In total, the findings in this article illustrate the potential of blockchain-based systems but also highlight technological shortcomings and challenges for commercial applications, such as scalability or privacy issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Benedikt Notheisen & Jacob Benjamin Cholewa & Arun Prasad Shanmugam, 2017. "Trading Real-World Assets on Blockchain," Business & Information Systems Engineering: The International Journal of WIRTSCHAFTSINFORMATIK, Springer;Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. (GI), vol. 59(6), pages 425-440, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:binfse:v:59:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s12599-017-0499-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s12599-017-0499-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Notheisen, Benedikt & Marino, Vincenzo & Englert, Daniel & Weinhardt, Christof, 2019. "Trading stocks on blocks: The quality of decentralized markets," Working Paper Series in Economics 129, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Business Engineering.

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