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Are telecommuting and personal travel complements or substitutes?

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  • Pengyu Zhu

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Pengyu Zhu, 2012. "Are telecommuting and personal travel complements or substitutes?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 48(2), pages 619-639, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:48:y:2012:i:2:p:619-639
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-011-0460-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James H. Stock, 2010. "The Other Transformation in Econometric Practice: Robust Tools for Inference," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(2), pages 83-94, Spring.
    2. Hall, Alastair R & Rudebusch, Glenn D & Wilcox, David W, 1996. "Judging Instrument Relevance in Instrumental Variables Estimation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(2), pages 283-298, May.
    3. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Handy, Susan L. & Salomon, Ilan, 1995. "Methodological issues in the estimation of the travel, energy, and air quality impacts of telecommuting," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 283-302, July.
    4. James J. Heckman & Thomas E. MaCurdy, 1985. "A Simultaneous Equations Linear Probability Model," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 18(1), pages 28-37, February.
    5. Patricia L Mokhtarian & Gustavo O Collantes & Carsten Gertz, 2004. "Telecommuting, residential location, and commute-distance traveled: evidence from State of California employees," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 36(10), pages 1877-1897, October.
    6. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
    7. Sangho Choo & Patricia Mokhtarian & Ilan Salomon, 2005. "Does telecommuting reduce vehicle-miles traveled? An aggregate time series analysis for the U.S," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 37-64, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:soceps:v:58:y:2017:i:c:p:22-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. de Vos, Duco & Meijers, Evert J. & van Ham, Maarten, 2017. "Working from Home and the Willingness to Accept a Longer Commute," IZA Discussion Papers 10875, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Reid Ewing & Harry W. Richardson & Keith Bartholomew & Arthur C. Nelson & Chang-Hee Christine Bae, 2014. "Compactness vs. Sprawl Revisited: Converging Views," CESifo Working Paper Series 4571, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. repec:eee:transa:v:103:y:2017:i:c:p:1-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Karima Kourtit & Peter Nijkamp & Mark D. Partridge & Janet E. Kohlhase, 2013. "The new urban world 2050: perspectives, prospects and problems," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(2), pages 153-165, June.
    6. repec:eee:transa:v:100:y:2017:i:c:p:40-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Kim, Seung-Nam & Choo, Sangho & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2015. "Home-based telecommuting and intra-household interactions in work and non-work travel: A seemingly unrelated censored regression approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 197-214.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    R41;

    JEL classification:

    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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