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Do high technology agglomerations encourage urban sprawl?

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  • Daniel Felsenstein

    () (Department of Geography, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem, Israel)

Abstract

This paper looks at the impact of high technology employment concentrations on urban sprawl. A methodology for translating spatial employment patterns, into place of residence patterns, is presented. On this basis, the consumption of land at the urban fringe due to both residential and non-residential uses, is estimated. The method is tested empirically using data relating to the two main outer suburban agglomerations of high technology activity in the Chicago metropolitan area. Two counter-factual situations are simulated. The first relates to a spatial counter-factual whereby the high tech concentrations develop in the city of Chicago or within the inner suburbs. The second presents an industry counter-factual that estimates the land consumption impacts arising from the development of an alternative industrial concentration in the same location. The results of the actual and hypothetical cases are compared. They point to a considerable saving in acreage in all alternative scenarios. Some policy implications are highlighted.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Felsenstein, 2002. "Do high technology agglomerations encourage urban sprawl?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 36(4), pages 663-682.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:36:y:2002:i:4:p:663-682 Note: Received: March 2001/Accepted: April 2002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Karima Kourtit & Daniel Arribas-Bel & Peter Nijkamp, 2012. "High performers in complex spatial systems: a self-organizing mapping approach with reference to The Netherlands," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, pages 501-527.
    2. Karima Kourtit & Daniel Arribas-Bel & Peter Nijkamp, 2013. "High Performance in Complex Spatial Systems: A Self-Organizing Mapping Approach with Reference to The Netherlands," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-194/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Amnon Frenkel & Sigal Kaplan, 2015. "The joint choice of tenure, dwelling type, size and location: the effect of home-oriented versus culture-oriented lifestyle," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, pages 233-251.
    4. Amnon Frenkel & Edward Benedit & Sigal Kaplan, 2011. "Residential choice of knowledge-workers in a 'startup metropolis': the role of amenities, workplace and lifestyle," ERSA conference papers ersa11p208, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • R33 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Nonagricultural and Nonresidential Real Estate Markets

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