IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sbp/journl/18.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Determining Import Intensity of Exports for Pakistan

Author

Listed:
  • Sadia Bader

    (State Bank of Pakistan)

Abstract

This study provides empirical evidence in support of the hypothesis that imports of intermediate and capital goods are critical inputs in the export production of the country. Thus, any short-run divergence in trade balance due to these would lead to higher exportable surplus in the long-run. In this context, the study estimates a semi-reduced export equation, for a sample of 1973-2005 annual data, through Ordinary Least Square method. The results indicate that in Pakistan’s case, there is a long-run relation between exports and imports of intermediate and capital goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Sadia Bader, 2006. "Determining Import Intensity of Exports for Pakistan," SBP Research Bulletin, State Bank of Pakistan, Research Department, vol. 2, pages 363-381..
  • Handle: RePEc:sbp:journl:18
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sbp.org.pk/research/bulletin/2006/vol2num2/Determining_Import_Intensity_of_Exports_for_Pakistan.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Robert M. Solow, 1956. "A Contribution to the Theory of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(1), pages 65-94.
    3. Mr. Michael Sarel, 1997. "Growth and Productivity in Asean Countries," IMF Working Papers 1997/097, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
    5. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    6. Dowling, Malcolm & Summers, Peter M, 1998. "Total Factor Productivity and Economic Growth--Issues for Asia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 74(225), pages 170-185, June.
    7. Nadiri, M Ishaq, 1970. "Some Approaches to the Theory and Measurement of Total Factor Productivity: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 1137-1177, December.
    8. Laurits R. Christensen & Dale W. Jorgenson, 1970. "U.S. Real Product And Real Factor Input, 1929–1967," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 16(1), pages 19-50, March.
    9. Grier, Kevin B. & Tullock, Gordon, 1989. "An empirical analysis of cross-national economic growth, 1951-1980," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 259-276, September.
    10. Ranis, Gustav, 1989. "The role of institutions in transition growth: The East Asian newly industrializing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(9), pages 1443-1453, September.
    11. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    12. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1994. "Endogenous Innovation in the Theory of Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 23-44, Winter.
    13. Charles R. Hulten, 2000. "Total Factor Productivity: A Short Biography," NBER Working Papers 7471, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Alwyn Young, 1995. "The Tyranny of Numbers: Confronting the Statistical Realities of the East Asian Growth Experience," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 641-680.
    15. Mr. Abdelhak S Senhadji, 1999. "Sources of Economic Growth: An Extensive Growth Accounting Exercise," IMF Working Papers 1999/077, International Monetary Fund.
    16. Abramovitz, Moses, 1993. "The Search for the Sources of Growth: Areas of Ignorance, Old and New," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 53(2), pages 217-243, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2013. "Pakistan : Finding the Path to Job-Enhancing Growth," World Bank Publications - Reports 15979, The World Bank Group.
    2. Rashid Amjad & Namra Awais, 2016. "Pakistan’s Productivity Performance and TFP Trends, 1980–2015: Cause for Real Concern," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 21(Special E), pages 33-63, September.
    3. Akanbi, Olusegun A. & Du Toit, Charlotte B., 2011. "Macro-econometric modelling for the Nigerian economy: A growth–poverty gap analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 335-350.
    4. Ahsan ul Haq Satti & Wasim Shahid Malik, 2017. "The Unreliability of Output-Gap Estimates in Real Time," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 56(3), pages 193-219.
    5. Jesus Felipe, 2009. "Does Pakistan Need To Adopt Inflation Targeting? Some Questions," SBP Research Bulletin, State Bank of Pakistan, Research Department, vol. 5, pages 113-162.
    6. Ahmed, Qazi Masood & Hyder, Kalim, 2007. "Determinants of Total Factor Productivity in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 16253, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jun 2007.
    7. Amjad, Rashid & Awais, Namra, 2016. "Pakistan's productivity performance and TFP trends 1980-2015: Cause for real concern," MPRA Paper 75017, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Ali, Syed Ozair, 2011. "Power, Profit and Inflation: A Study of Inflation and Influence in Pakistan," EconStor Preprints 157853, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Safdar Ullah Khan, 2006. "Macro Determeinants of Total Factor Productivity in Pakistan," SBP Working Paper Series 10, State Bank of Pakistan, Research Department.
    2. Khan, Safdar Ullah Khan, 2005. "Macro Determinants of Total Factor Productivity in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 8693, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Sep 2005.
    3. Robert W. Arnold, 2003. "Modeling Long-Run Economic Growth: Technical Paper 2003-04," Working Papers 14497, Congressional Budget Office.
    4. Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 103-126, October.
    5. Turnovsky, S., 2000. "Growth in an Open Economy: some Recent Developments," Papers 5, Warwick - Development Economics Research Centre.
    6. Sefa Awaworyi Churchill & Mehmet Ugur & Siew Ling Yew, 2017. "Does Government Size Affect Per-Capita Income Growth? A Hierarchical Meta-Regression Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93(300), pages 142-171, March.
    7. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:2:y:2002:i:1:p:1-15 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Gene M. Grossman & Elhanan Helpman, 1994. "Endogenous Innovation in the Theory of Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 23-44, Winter.
    9. Michael Peneder & Karl Aiginger & Gernot Hutschenreiter & Markus Marterbauer, 2001. "Structural Change and Economic Growth," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 20668, January.
    10. Capolupo, Rosa, 2009. "The New Growth Theories and Their Empirics after Twenty Years," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal (2007-2020), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel), vol. 3, pages 1-72.
    11. Aykut Kibritçioglu, 2002. "On the Smithian origins of "new" trade and growth theories," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 2(1), pages 1-15.
    12. Kashif Munir & Shahzad Arshad, 2018. "Factor accumulation and economic growth in Pakistan: incorporating human capital," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 45(3), pages 480-491, March.
    13. Łukasz Jabłoński, 2011. "Kapitał ludzki w wybranych modelach wzrostu gospodarczego," Gospodarka Narodowa. The Polish Journal of Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 1-2, pages 81-103.
    14. Shanaka Herath, 2009. "The Size of the Government and Economic Growth: An Empirical Study of Sri Lanka," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2009_08, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    15. Roberto Gásquez & Vicente Royuela, 2014. "Is Football an Indicator of Development at the International Level?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 827-848, July.
    16. Hulten, Charles R., 2010. "Growth Accounting," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, in: Bronwyn H. Hall & Nathan Rosenberg (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 0, pages 987-1031, Elsevier.
    17. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1991. "Cross-country studies of growth and policy : methodological, conceptual, and statistical problems," Policy Research Working Paper Series 608, The World Bank.
    18. Ejike Udeogu & Shampa Roy-Mukherjee & Uzochukwu Amakom, 2021. "Does Increasing Product Complexity and Diversity Cause Economic Growth in the Long-Run? A GMM Panel VAR Evidence," SAGE Open, , vol. 11(3), pages 21582440211, August.
    19. Aikaterini Kokkinou, 2005. "Entrepreneurship, Innovation Activities and Regional Growth," ERSA conference papers ersa05p419, European Regional Science Association.
    20. Ekaterina Ponomareva & Alexandra Bozhechkova & Alexandr Knobel, 2012. "Factors of Economic Growth," Published Papers 172, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, revised 2013.
    21. Hartwig, Jochen, 2014. "Testing the Uzawa–Lucas model with OECD data," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 144-156.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Export; Imports; Intermediate Goods; Semi-reduced Function; Pakistan;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sbp:journl:18. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/sbpgvpk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Faisal Saleem (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/sbpgvpk.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.