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Public Sector Corruption and Natural Hazards

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  • Monica Escaleras
  • Charles Register

Abstract

Public sector corruption has been shown to increase death rates and damages from natural disasters. We consider whether natural hazards can lead to rising levels of public sector corruption. This might seem unlikely since natural hazards are predetermined, naturally occurring events. However, when the distinction between hazards and disasters is considered, it becomes clear that corruption may well increase the likelihood that any new hazard will become a disaster, increasing the existing level of corruption within a given country. Based on standard estimation techniques, we find a statistically significant, positive relation between predetermined natural hazards and public sector corruption.

Suggested Citation

  • Monica Escaleras & Charles Register, 2016. "Public Sector Corruption and Natural Hazards," Public Finance Review, , vol. 44(6), pages 746-768, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:pubfin:v:44:y:2016:i:6:p:746-768
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    References listed on IDEAS

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