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Europe Without Borders? The Effect of the Euro on Price Convergence


  • Hisham Foad

    (San Diego State University, San Diego, California,


Has the introduction of the Euro reduced the economic significance of national borders across the Euro Area? This article extends Engel and Rogers well known work on border effects to cities across Western Europe over the period 1995—2004. Although cross-border prices across the Euro Area are still more volatile than within-country prices, the importance of the border has diminished since the euro was introduced in 1999. The impact of the common currency on the border effect varies by country size, with the largest decreases occurring between larger Euro countries. Although cross-border price volatility has not changed between the United Kingdom and large Euro countries, volatility has actually increased between the small Euro countries and the United Kingdom. These results are consistent with the fact that exchange rates are more likely to adjust to price differentials between small countries than between large countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Hisham Foad, 2010. "Europe Without Borders? The Effect of the Euro on Price Convergence," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 33(1), pages 86-111, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:inrsre:v:33:y:2010:i:1:p:86-111

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Méjean, Isabelle & Schwellnus, Cyrille, 2009. "Price convergence in the European Union: Within firms or composition of firms?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 1-10, June.
    2. Mohsin, Hasan M & Gilbert, Scott, 2010. "Relative City Price Convergence in Pakistan: Empirical Evidence from Spatial GLS," MPRA Paper 27901, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Leon Podkaminer, 2013. "Persistent gaps between purchasing power parities and exchange rates under the law of one price: a puzzle (partly) explained?," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 44(4), pages 333-352.
    4. Jan-Egbert Sturm & Ulrich Fritsche & Michael Graff & Michael Lamla & Sarah Lein & Volker Nitsch & David Liechti & Daniel Triet, 2009. "The euro and prices: changeover-related inflation and price convergence in the euro area," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 381, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    5. Hasan Muhammad Mohsin & Scott Gilbert, 2010. "The Relative City Price Convergence in Pakistan: Empirical Evidence from Spatial GLS," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 49(4), pages 439-448.


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