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Quantile Regression Evidence on Italian Education Returns

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  • Pamela Giustinelli

    () (University of Verona)

Abstract

This study intends to provide some updated empirical evidence on Italian Education Returns through Quantile Regression. Such a methodology enables us to explore the (Quantile Treatment) Effect of Schooling on the (shape of) income conditional distribution (viewed as reflecting the distribution of unobservable ability), and to analyze indirectly the education-ability interaction in the generation of human capital, and its effect on earnings. We obtain estimates displaying a U-shaped pattern, i.e. higher returns at the highest and lowest quantiles of income, suggesting substitution among human capital factors for low ability individuals, and complementarity for high ability earners.

Suggested Citation

  • Pamela Giustinelli, 2004. "Quantile Regression Evidence on Italian Education Returns," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 94(6), pages 49-100, November-.
  • Handle: RePEc:rpo:ripoec:v:94:y:2004:i:6:p:49-100
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    File URL: http://www.rivistapoliticaeconomica.it/2004/nov-dic/GiustinelliING.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ichino, Andrea & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 1999. "Lower and upper bounds of returns to schooling: An exercise in IV estimation with different instruments," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 889-901, April.
    2. Martins, Pedro S. & Pereira, Pedro T., 2004. "Does education reduce wage inequality? Quantile regression evidence from 16 countries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 355-371, June.
    3. Omar Arias & Walter Sosa-Escudero & Kevin F. Hallock, 2001. "Individual heterogeneity in the returns to schooling: instrumental variables quantile regression using twins data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 7-40.
    4. Moshe Buchinsky, 1998. "Recent Advances in Quantile Regression Models: A Practical Guideline for Empirical Research," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 88-126.
    5. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1992. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 1-40, February.
    6. Hause, John C, 1972. "Earnings Profile: Ability and Schooling," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(3), pages 108-138, Part II, .
    7. Mwabu, Germano & Schultz, T Paul, 1996. "Education Returns across Quantiles of the Wage Function: Alternative Explanations for Returns to Education by Race in South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 335-339, May.
    8. Honore, Bo E & Hu, Luojia, 2004. "On the Performance of Some Robust Instrumental Variables Estimators," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 22(1), pages 30-39, January.
    9. Bernd Fitzenberger & Claudia Kurz, 2003. "New insights on earnings trends across skill groups and industries in West Germany," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 479-514, July.
    10. Buchinsky, Moshe, 1995. "Estimating the asymptotic covariance matrix for quantile regression models a Monte Carlo study," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 303-338, August.
    11. Card, David, 2001. "Estimating the Return to Schooling: Progress on Some Persistent Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(5), pages 1127-1160, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paolo Naticchioni & Andrea Ricci, 2009. "Falling Educational Wage Premia in Italy," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 4, December.
    2. Paolo Naticchioni & Andrea Ricci & Emiliano Rustichelli, 2008. "Wage Inequality, Employment Structure and Skill-biased Change in Italy," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(s1), pages 27-51, June.
    3. Paolo Naticchioni & Andrea Ricci, 2009. "Decreasing Wage Inequality in Italy: The Role of Supply and Demand for Education," Working Papers - Dipartimento di Economia 9-DEISFOL, Dipartimento di Economia, Sapienza University of Rome, revised 2009.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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