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Challenges of Missing Data in Analyses of Aid Activity: The Case of US Aid Activity

Author

Listed:
  • Udvari, Beáta

    (University of Szeged, Hungary)

  • Dávid Kiss, Gábor

    (University of Szeged, Hungary)

  • Pontet, Julianna

    (University of Szeged, Hungary)

Abstract

Analysing aid activities has been in the centre of academic research; nevertheless, it is demanding to conduct long-term time series analyses due to missing data. Although there are several methods available to overcome this challenge, their distortion effect may result in unpredicted impacts on aid allocation. Thus, this paper aims to analyse the long-term motivations of US aid allocation with panel regression models. Two methods of handling missing data were tested in order to answer the question whether there is a significant difference in the results or not. Results suggest that there are several tools in the hands of a researcher to overcome missing data problems without any distorting effects. Furthermore, results reinforce the idea that US aid allocation has mainly been motivated by its economic drivers (export possibilities) rather than by war or conflict fears in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Udvari, Beáta & Dávid Kiss, Gábor & Pontet, Julianna, 2016. "Challenges of Missing Data in Analyses of Aid Activity: The Case of US Aid Activity," Bangladesh Development Studies, Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS), vol. 39(1-2), pages 1-25, March-Jun.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:badest:0001
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Aid Allocation; Missing Data; Panel Regression;

    JEL classification:

    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid

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