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Drop in consumption associated with retirement. The regression discontinuity design approach

  • Nivorozhkina, Ludmila

    ()

    (Rostov State Economic University, Russia)

  • Nivorozhkin, Anton

    ()

    (Institute for Employment Research, Germany)

  • Abazieva, Kamilla

    ()

    (Moscow State University of Technology and Management (Rostov branch))

Registered author(s):

    In this paper we investigate the size of the consumption drop in Russia We use micro data on the household consumption of food and non-durables collected during the survey of household welfare and participation in social programs (NOBUS) We use the regression discontinuity design and impose an identifying assumption that consumption would be the same around the threshold of pension eligibility if individuals did not retire We estimate that a 20 6 percent drop in consumption is associated with retirement induced by eligibility

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    File URL: http://pe.cemi.rssi.ru/pe_2010_3_112-126.pdf
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    Article provided by Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS" in its journal Applied Econometrics.

    Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 112-126

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    Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0008
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://appliedeconometrics.cemi.rssi.ru/

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