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Analytical notes on the Balassa-Samuelson effect

Author

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  • Leon Podkaminer

    () (The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (WIIW), Vienna (Austria))

Abstract

The oft invoked Balassa-Samuelson effect, whereby the movements of prices for non-tradable goods relative to those for tradable goods reflect the movements of relative labour productivities, is customarily derived from a standard neo-classical model with highly restrictive features. Minor modifications to the assumptions underlying the model negate the effect. In general, the effect does not necessarily obtain if technical change alters the elasticity parameters of the production functions. Moreover, theeffect does not generally obtain (or cannot even be derived uniquely) in more general models that allow for non-constant returns to scale or intermediate inputs.

Suggested Citation

  • Leon Podkaminer, 2003. "Analytical notes on the Balassa-Samuelson effect," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 56(226), pages 207-221.
  • Handle: RePEc:psl:bnlqrr:2003:32
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    File URL: http://ojs.uniroma1.it/index.php/PSLQuarterlyReview/article/view/9898/9780
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Willem H. Buiter & Clemens Grafe, 2002. "Anchor, float or abandon ship: exchange rate regimes for the accession countries," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 55(221), pages 111-142.
    2. De Gregorio, Jose & Giovannini, Alberto & Wolf, Holger C., 1994. "International evidence on tradables and nontradables inflation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1225-1244, June.
    3. Froot, Kenneth A. & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Perspectives on PPP and long-run real exchange rates," Handbook of International Economics,in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 32, pages 1647-1688 Elsevier.
    4. Buiter, Willem H. & Grafe, Clemens, 2002. "Anchor, Float or Abandon Ship: Exchange Rate Regimes for Accession Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 3184, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ronald MacDonald & Cezary Wójcik, 2006. "Catching-up, Inflation Differentials and Credit Booms in a Heterogeneous Monetary Union: Some Implications for EMU and new EU Member States," CESifo Working Paper Series 1761, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Leon Podkaminer, 2004. "Why is food cheaper in rich (European) countries?," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 57(230), pages 297-327.
    3. Alessandro Podkaminer, 2004. "PerchŽ i generi alimentari sono meno costosi nei paesi (europei) ricchi?," Moneta e Credito, Economia civile, vol. 57(227), pages 311-345.
    4. MacDonald, Ronald & Wójcik, Cezary, 2008. "Catching-up and inflation differentials in a heterogeneous monetary union: Some implications for the euro area and new EU Member States," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 4-16, March.
    5. Leon Podkaminer, 2013. "Persistent gaps between purchasing power parities and exchange rates under the law of one price: a puzzle (partly) explained?," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 44(4), pages 333-352.
    6. Richard Frensch, 2006. "Balassa-Samuelson, Product Differentiation and Transition," Working Papers 266, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technical;

    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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