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Inflation, unemployment and the position of the central bank: the opinion of the public

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  • H.M. PRAST

    (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

Recent theoretical developments in monetary policy are based on the view that the effectiveness of monetary policy is strongly influenced by the interaction between the behaviour of the monetary policy-makers and the private sector. Optimal monetary policy and the possible desirability of central bank independence are directly related to respective assumptions about the information and opinion of the private sector. These assumptions are tested in Italy and the Netherlands. Surveys conducted through telephone and face-to-face interviews show central bank independence and future inflation estimates that are higher among people with higher education and lower for those with lower education. Also revealed is a central bank that is more concerned with unemployment and a government that is concerned with inflation. The glaring result, however, is the public's lack of awareness about a trade-off between inflation and unemployment.

Suggested Citation

  • H.M. Prast, 1996. "Inflation, unemployment and the position of the central bank: the opinion of the public," BNL Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 49(199), pages 415-454.
  • Handle: RePEc:psl:bnlaqr:1996:43
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    File URL: http://ojs.uniroma1.it/index.php/PSLQuarterlyReview/article/view/10618/10502
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lohmann, Susanne, 1992. "Optimal Commitment in Monetary Policy: Credibility versus Flexibility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 273-286, March.
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    3. Svensson, Lars E O, 1997. "Optimal Inflation Targets, "Conservative" Central Banks, and Linear Inflation Contracts," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 98-114, March.
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    7. Prast, Henriette M, 1996. "Commitment Rather Than Independence: An Institutional Design for Reducing the Inflationary Bias of Monetary Policy," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 377-405.
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    Cited by:

    1. van Lelyveld, Iman, 1999. "Inflation or unemployment? Who cares?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 463-484, September.
    2. Hayo, Bernd & Hefeker, Carsten, 2002. "Reconsidering central bank independence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 653-674, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Domestic Monetary Policy; Public opinion;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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