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Přímé zahraniční investice a technologická změna
[Foreign direct investment and technology change]


  • Martin Srholec


Paper focuses on foreign direct investment (FDI) in manufacturing in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia (CECs), where FDI penetration jumped to remarkable high levels in recent years. Foreign investment enterprises are more profitable, export oriented and technologically superior compared to domestic companies. FDI is perceived as a main channel of technology transfer and potential source of spillovers in host economy, though, estimates of technology transfer show mixed picture in the CECs. FDI spurs restructuring and productivity growth in foreign investment enterprises but FDI rather crowds-out domestic companies as spillovers are confirmed only to domestic companies with sufficient technological absorptive capacity. Paper concludes with some policy implications regarding FDI promotion and innovation policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Srholec, 2003. "Přímé zahraniční investice a technologická změna
    [Foreign direct investment and technology change]
    ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2003(5).
  • Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpol:v:2003:y:2003:i:5:id:421

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Claudia Goldin, 2004. "The Long Road to the Fast Track: Career and Family," NBER Working Papers 10331, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Claudia Goldin, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 1-21, May.
    3. Balcar Jiří & Filipová Lenka & Machová Zuzana, 2012. "Gender Wage Gap in the Czech Republic: First Descriptive Analysis Based on Survey 2011," Review of Economic Perspectives, De Gruyter Open, vol. 12(3), pages 151-167, October.
    4. Luisa Escriche, 2007. "Persistence of Occupational Segregation: the Role of the Intergenerational Transmission of Preferences," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(520), pages 837-857, April.
    5. Goldin, Claudia, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women’s Employment, Education, and Family," Scholarly Articles 2943933, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    6. Luisa Escriche & Gonzalo Olcina & Rosario Sánchez, 2004. "Gender discrimination and intergenerational transmission of preferences," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(3), pages 485-511, July.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Elisa Galeotti & Eva Ryšavá, 2008. "The endogeneity problem and fdi in transition: evidence from the privatized glass sector," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2008(4), pages 319-339.
    2. Martin Srholec, 2014. "Cooperation and Innovative Performance of Firms: Panel Data Evidence from the Czech Republic, Norway and the UK," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 5(1), pages 133-155, March.

    More about this item


    foreign direct investment; transition economies; technology gap; manufacturing industry; technology transfer;

    JEL classification:

    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes


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