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Market Volatility, Manipulation, and Regulatory Response: A Comparative Study of Bombay and Karachi Stock Markets


  • Jamshed Y. Uppal

    (Department of Business and Economics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC)

  • Inayat U. Mangla

    (, Haworth College of Business, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan.)


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Jamshed Y. Uppal & Inayat U. Mangla, 2006. "Market Volatility, Manipulation, and Regulatory Response: A Comparative Study of Bombay and Karachi Stock Markets," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 45(4), pages 1071-1083.
  • Handle: RePEc:pid:journl:v:45:y:2006:i:4:p:1071-1083

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. De Long, J Bradford, et al, 1990. " Positive Feedback Investment Strategies and Destabilizing Rational Speculation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(2), pages 379-395, June.
    2. Ashima Goyal, 2006. "Regulation and Deregulation of the Stock Market in India," Chapters,in: Deregulation and its Discontents, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Kaushik Bhattacharya & Nityananda Sarkar & Debabrata Mukhopadhyay, 2003. "Stability of the day of the week effect in return and in volatility at the Indian capital market: a GARCH approach with proper mean specification," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(8), pages 553-563.
    4. Bollerslev, Tim, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 307-327, April.
    5. Kane, Edward J, 1988. "Interaction of Financial and Regulatory Innovation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 328-334, May.
    6. Venkat Eleswarapu & Chandrasekar Krishnamurti, 1995. "Do `speculative traders' increase Stock Price Volatility? Empirical evidence from the Bombay Stock Exchange," Finance 9507006, EconWPA.
    7. Khwaja, Asim Ijaz & Mian, Atif, 2005. "Unchecked intermediaries: Price manipulation in an emerging stock market," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 203-241, October.
    8. Berkman, Henk & Eleswarapu, Venkat R., 1998. "Short-term traders and liquidity: a test using Bombay Stock Exchange data," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 339-355, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maxim, Maruf Rahman & Ashif, Abu Sadat Muhammad, 2017. "A new method of measuring stock market manipulation through structural equation modeling (SEM)," MPRA Paper 82891, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Siddiqi, Hammad, 2009. "Information Transmission and Micro-structure rents in Emerging Markets," MPRA Paper 15452, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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