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Veiling

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  • Jean-Paul Carvalho

Abstract

Veiling among Muslim women is modeled as a commitment mechanism that limits temptation to deviate from religious norms of behavior. The analysis suggests that veiling is a strategy for integration, enabling women to take up outside economic opportunities while preserving their reputation within the community. This accounts for puzzling features of the new veiling movement since the 1970s. Veiling also has surprising effects on the intergenerational transmission of values. Compulsory veiling laws can lead to a decline in religiosity. Bans on veiling can inhibit social integration and increase religiosity. JEL Codes: C72, C73, Z1 Copyright 2013, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Paul Carvalho, 2013. "Veiling," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(1), pages 337-370.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:128:y:2013:i:1:p:337-370
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/qje/qjs045
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Austen-Smith & Roland G. Fryer, 2005. "An Economic Analysis of "Acting White"," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(2), pages 551-583.
    2. David Austen-Smith & Ronald G. Fryer, 2005. "An Economic Analysis of 'Acting White'," Discussion Papers 1399, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Veiling bans can be counterproductive
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-08-04 18:52:00

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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