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The economic consequences of Brexit: energy

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  • Michael G. Pollitt

Abstract

In this paper we raise a number of issues that are important for the UK to consider in the light of its decision to leave the European Union (EU). The first of these is the nature of the EU Single Market in Electricity and Gas and the UK’s role within this. The second is the nature of UK energy policy in the light of Brexit, and the opportunities for changing this. And third, we consider some of the key issues to be addressed in a negotiating position with the EU.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael G. Pollitt, 2017. "The economic consequences of Brexit: energy," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(suppl_1), pages 134-143.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:33:y:2017:i:suppl_1:p:s134-s143.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oxrep/grx013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael G. Pollitt and Karim L. Anaya, 2016. "Can current electricity markets cope with high shares of renewables? A comparison of approaches in Germany, the UK and the State of New York," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Bollino-M).
    2. Pollitt, Michael G., 2012. "The role of policy in energy transitions: Lessons from the energy liberalisation era," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 128-137.
    3. Jamasb, T. & Pollitt, M., 2004. "Electricity Market Reform in the European Union: Review of progress towards liberalisation and integration," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0471, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Michael G. Pollitt, 2009. "Electricity Liberalisation in the European Union: A Progress Report," Working Papers EPRG 0929, Energy Policy Research Group, Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge.
    5. Newbery, David & Strbac, Goran & Viehoff, Ivan, 2016. "The benefits of integrating European electricity markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 253-263.
    6. Helm, Dieter, 2004. "Energy, the State, and the Market: British Energy Policy since 1979," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199270743.
    7. Pollitt, Michael G., 2012. "Lessons from the history of independent system operators in the energy sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 32-48.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:enepol:v:129:y:2019:i:c:p:653-660 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:enepol:v:129:y:2019:i:c:p:459-466 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:gam:jeners:v:10:y:2017:i:12:p:2143-:d:123111 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:rensus:v:91:y:2018:i:c:p:695-707 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Lynch, Muireann A, 2017. "Re-evaluating Irish energy policy in light of brexit," Research Notes RN20170201, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    6. repec:gam:jeners:v:12:y:2019:i:4:p:600-:d:205761 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:eee:enepol:v:111:y:2017:i:c:p:148-156 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Newbery, David & Pollitt, Michael G. & Ritz, Robert A. & Strielkowski, Wadim, 2018. "Market design for a high-renewables European electricity system," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 695-707.
    9. repec:esr:forcas:qec20172 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brexit; energy policy;

    JEL classification:

    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities

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