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How the Danes discovered Britain: the international integration of the Danish dairy industry before 1880

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  • Markus Lampe
  • Paul Sharp

Abstract

The success of Danish agricultural exports at the end of the nineteenth century is often attributed to the establishment of a direct trade with Britain after the loss of Schleswig-Holstein to Prussia in 1864, and with it the connection to the port of Hamburg. We show that Danish–English butter markets were actually integrated already in the eighteenth century, but through the Hamburg hub, which provided advantages such as density of information, trade connections, and credit availability. These eroded gradually, and movements to establish a direct trade were underway from the 1850s. Defeat in war only speeded up the process.

Suggested Citation

  • Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2015. "How the Danes discovered Britain: the international integration of the Danish dairy industry before 1880," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 432-453.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ereveh:v:19:y:2015:i:4:p:432-453.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/ereh/hev013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sofia Teives Henriques & Paul Sharp, 2016. "The Danish agricultural revolution in an energy perspective: a case of development with few domestic energy sources," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 69(3), pages 844-869, August.
    2. Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2017. "ÔRationalÕ Farmers and the Emergence of Modern Accounting in Danish Dairying," Working Papers 0115, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Peter Sandholt Jensen & Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp & Christian Volmar Skovsgaard, 2018. "‘Getting to Denmark’: the Role of Elites for Development," Working Papers 0125, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    4. Eoin McLaughlin & Paul Sharp, 2015. "Competition between organisational forms in Danish and Irish dairying around the turn of the twentieth century," Discussion Papers in Environment and Development Economics 2015-16, University of St. Andrews, School of Geography and Sustainable Development.
    5. Richard Pomfret & Markus Lampe & Florian Ploeckl, 2014. "Spanning the Globe: The Rise of Global Communications Systems and the First Globalisation," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 54(3), pages 242-261, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • L1 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance
    • N5 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries
    • N7 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services
    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture

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