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Cities of Commerce: how can we test the hypothesis?

Author

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  • Guillaume Daudin

    (LEDa - Laboratoire d'Economie de Dauphine - Université Paris-Dauphine)

Abstract

This paper discusses Gelderblom’s hypothesis that urban competition (including a large number of competing cities, footloose foreign traders and municipal autonomy) was central to the rise of inclusive trade institutions in Europe. The first part discusses the precise behaviour of traders, town authorities and sovereigns underlying Gelderblom’s explanatory framework. The second part presents some challenges to the generalisation of the book’s thesis to the history of Europe, including Italy and Britain. The last part advances a short econometric exercise to check this generalisation. Urban competition combined with starting institutional quality does not emerge as a positive factor for the growth of European cities in general: this is interpreted as a call for more research rather a decisive counter-argument.

Suggested Citation

  • Guillaume Daudin, 2017. "Cities of Commerce: how can we test the hypothesis?," Working Papers hal-01494926, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01494926
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01494926
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    Cited by:

    1. Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2015. "How the Danes discovered Britain: the international integration of the Danish dairy industry before 1880," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 432-453.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    urbanisation; modern history; Europe; institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • N13 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N23 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N94 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Europe: 1913-

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