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Optimal Control of Vector-Virus-Plant Interactions: The Case of Potato Leafroll Virus Net Necrosis

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  • Thomas L. Marsh
  • Ray G. Huffaker
  • Garrell E. Long

Abstract

This paper introduces a new specification to the economic pest management literature designed to optimally manage vector-virus-plant interactions for a single crop. The viral, insect-vector, and plant-host stocks are treated as renewable resources and conjunctively controlled in a discrete-time control framework subject to crop quality standards established in marketing contracts. The result is a conceptual integrated pest management model providing optimal insecticide scheduling and dynamic decision-making thresholds in a novel economic pest management context. Model results are compared qualitatively with those from previous specifications. The model is applied empirically to control potato leafroll virus net necrosis in commercial potato production. Copyright 2000, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas L. Marsh & Ray G. Huffaker & Garrell E. Long, 2000. "Optimal Control of Vector-Virus-Plant Interactions: The Case of Potato Leafroll Virus Net Necrosis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(3), pages 556-569.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:82:y:2000:i:3:p:556-569
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/0002-9092.00046
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhao, Zishun & Wahl, Thomas I. & Marsh, Thomas L., 2006. "Invasive Species Management: Foot-and-Mouth Disease in the U.S. Beef Industry," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 35(1), April.
    2. Grogan, Kelly A., 2014. "When ignorance is not bliss: Pest control decisions involving beneficial insects," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 104-113.
    3. Mitchell, Paul D. & Hurley, Terrance M. & Babcock, Bruce A. & Hellmich, Richard L., 2002. "Insuring The Stewardship Of Bt Corn: 'A Carrot' Versus 'A Stick'," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 27(02), December.
    4. Barry, Peter J. & Stanton, Bernard F., 2003. "Major Ideas In The History Of Agricultural Finance And Farm Management," Working Papers 14750, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    5. Cobourn, Kelly M. & Goodhue, Rachael E. & Williams, Jeffrey C., 2009. "The Role of Harvest Timing in Pest Management: Grower Response to Infestation by the California Olive Fruit Fly," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49475, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Mitchell, Paul D., 2001. "Additive Versus Proportional Pest Damage Functions: Why Ecology Matters," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20775, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Perry, William R. & Marsh, Thomas & Jones, Rodney & Sanderson, M.W. & Sargeant, J.M. & Griffin, D.D. & Smith, R.A., 2007. "Joint product management strategies for E. coli O157 and feedlot profits," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5-6), pages 544-565.
    8. Schumacher, Sara K. & Marsh, Thomas L. & Williams, Kimberly A., 2003. "Optimal Pest Control In Floriculture Production Of Ornamental Crops," 2003 Annual Meeting, February 1-5, 2003, Mobile, Alabama 35025, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    9. Fournier, Valerie & Manfredo, Mark R. & Richards, Timothy J. & Eaves, James, 2005. "Managing Economic Risk from Invasive Species: Bug Options," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19553, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Carter, Colin A. & Chalfant, James A. & Goodhue, Rachael E., 2004. "Invasive Species In Agriculture: A Rising Concern," Western Economics Forum, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 3(02), December.
    11. Schumacher, Sara K. & Marsh, Thomas L. & Williams, Kimberly A., 2000. "Economic Thresholds: An Application To Floriculture," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21790, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    12. Grogan, Kelly A., 2013. "When Ignorance Is Not Bliss: Pest Control Decisions Involving Beneficial Insects," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149610, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Singbo, Alphonse G. & Lansink, Alfons Oude & Emvalomatis, Grigorios, 2015. "Estimating shadow prices and efficiency analysis of productive inputs and pesticide use of vegetable production," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 245(1), pages 265-272.
    14. Lu, Liang & Elbakidze, Levan, 2012. "Application of Comparative Dynamics in Stochastic Invasive Species Management in Agricultural Production," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 125226, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    15. Fuller, Kate B. & Alston, Julian M. & Sanchirico, James N., 2011. "Spatial Externalities and Vector-Borne Plant Diseases: Pierce’s Disease and the Blue-Green Sharpshooter in the Napa Valley," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103865, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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