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The New Zealand dollar through the global financial crisis

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In this article, we examine the impact of the global financial crisis on the New Zealand dollar (NZD). The NZD fell, on a trade-weighted basis, by 35 percent over the period from 2007 to early 2009 during the peak of the crisis, and remains around 10-12 percent below its pre-crisis peak. The impact of the carry trade on the value of the NZD appears to have diminished, as international investors shifted their attention to higher-yielding currencies, such as the Australian dollar and the Brazilian real. There have also been several periods of market turbulence during the crisis, during which movements in the exchange rate have been driven primarily by declines in the risk appetite of international investors. These developments are consistent with the decline in liquidity in the NZD currency market compared to pre-crisis levels. Our regime-switching model of the NZD/US dollar (USD) exchange rate identifies several instances during the past three years when the key exchange rate driver has changed from relative interest rates to investors’ risk appetite.

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  • Enzo Cassino & Zoe Wallis, 2010. "The New Zealand dollar through the global financial crisis," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 73, pages 20-30, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzb:nzbbul:sept2010:2
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    File URL: http://www.rbnz.govt.nz/-/media/ReserveBank/Files/Publications/Bulletins/2010/2010sep73-3cassinowallis.pdf
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    1. David Drage & Anella Munro & Cath Sleeman, 2005. "An update on Eurokiwi and Uridashi bonds," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 68, September.
    2. Marion Kohler, 2010. "Exchange rates during financial crises," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Chih-Liang & Yang, Hsin-Feng, 2017. "Systemic risk in carry-trade portfolios," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 40-46.
    2. Yiuman Tse & Lin Zhao, 2011. "The Relationship between Currency Carry Trades and U.S. Stocks The article examines the relationship between daily returns of currency carry trades and U.S. stocks from January 1995 through September ," Working Papers 0005, College of Business, University of Texas at San Antonio.
    3. Willy Chetwin & Tim Ng & Daan Steenkamp, 2013. "New Zealand’s short- and medium-term real exchange rate volatility: drivers and policy implications," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2013/03, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    4. Ashley Dunstan, 2014. "The interaction between monetary and macro-prudential policy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 77, pages 15-25, June.
    5. Chris McDonald, 2012. "Kiwi drivers the New Zealand dollar experience," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2012/02, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

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