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A Theory of Innovation: Market Transition, Property Rights, and Innovative Activity

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  • Victor Nee
  • Jeong-han Kang
  • Sonja Opper

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to specify a theory to explain why transitions to a market economy cause a shift to a higher level of innovation. Marketization increases the power of economic actors relative to political actors, increases inter-firm competition, creates new opportunities for entrepreneurship, and subsequently motivates innovative activity. For our empirical application, we focus on China's transition economy, which offers a broad range of institutional environments to examine the relation between market transition and increasing innovative activity by entrepreneurs and firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Victor Nee & Jeong-han Kang & Sonja Opper, 2010. "A Theory of Innovation: Market Transition, Property Rights, and Innovative Activity," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 166(3), pages 397-425, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:mhr:jinste:urn:sici:0932-4569(201009)166:3_397:atoimt_2.0.tx_2-d
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philippe Aghion & Nick Bloom & Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & Peter Howitt, 2005. "Competition and Innovation: an Inverted-U Relationship," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(2), pages 701-728.
    2. Lawrence J. Lau & Yingyi Qian & Gerard Roland, 2000. "Reform without Losers: An Interpretation of China's Dual-Track Approach to Transition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(1), pages 120-143, February.
    3. Kenneth Arrow, 1962. "Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention," NBER Chapters,in: The Rate and Direction of Inventive Activity: Economic and Social Factors, pages 609-626 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Oliver Hart & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1997. "The Proper Scope of Government: Theory and an Application to Prisons," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1127-1161.
    5. Josef C. Brada, 1996. "Privatization Is Transition--Or Is It?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 67-86, Spring.
    6. Nee, Victor & Opper, Sonja & Wong, Sonia, 2007. "Developmental State and Corporate Governance in China," Management and Organization Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(01), pages 19-53, March.
    7. Jacques Mairesse & Pierre Mohnen, 2002. "Accounting for Innovation and Measuring Innovativeness: An Illustrative Framework and an Application," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 226-230, May.
    8. Yingyi Qian & Chenggang Xu, 1998. "Innovation and Bureaucracy Under Soft and Hard Budget Constraints," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(1), pages 151-164.
    9. Baumol, William J., 1996. "Entrepreneurship: Productive, unproductive, and destructive," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 3-22, January.
    10. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    11. Victor Nee & Sonja Opper & Sonia Wong, 2007. "Developmental State and Corporate Governance in China," Management and Organization Review, The International Association for Chinese Management Research, vol. 3(1), pages 19-53, March.
    12. repec:hrv:faseco:30727607 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1994. "Politicians and Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 995-1025.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • P31 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Socialist Enterprises and Their Transitions
    • P3 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions

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