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The consensus view on interest rates and fiscal policy: reality or innocent fraud?

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  • Alvaro Angeriz
  • Philip Arestis

Abstract

Current economic policy upgrades monetary policy and downgrades fiscal policy. Monetary policy involves the manipulation of the central bank interest rate, with the specific objective of achieving the main goal of monetary policy, which is, in most cases, the inflation rate. Fiscal policy should not be used as an instrument of stabilization policy. This raises two issues. The first is the theoretical underpinnings of this mode of economic policy. The second is the extent the quantitative impact of monetary and fiscal policy in the real world adhere to the principles set out by theory. Both aspects are investigated in this paper. We summarize results drawn from the euro area, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Two important conclusions emerge: the empirical results point to a relatively weak effect of interest rate changes on inflation. Also, monetary policy can have long-run effects on real magnitudes. Fiscal policy does have strong effects after all.

Suggested Citation

  • Alvaro Angeriz & Philip Arestis, 2009. "The consensus view on interest rates and fiscal policy: reality or innocent fraud?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(4), pages 567-586, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:31:y:2009:i:4:p:567-586
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer, 2003. "Reinventing fiscal policy," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(1), pages 3-25.
    2. Günter Coenen & Roland Straub, 2005. "Does Government Spending Crowd in Private Consumption? Theory and Empirical Evidence for the Euro Area," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 435-470, December.
    3. Mark Gertler & Jordi Gali & Richard Clarida, 1999. "The Science of Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1661-1707, December.
    4. Barro, Robert J, 1974. "Are Government Bonds Net Wealth?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1095-1117, Nov.-Dec..
    5. Atish Ghosh & Steven Phillips, 1998. "Warning: Inflation May Be Harmful to Your Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(4), pages 672-710, December.
    6. Peter van Els & Alberto Locarno & Julian Morgan & Jean-Pierre Villetelle, 2001. "Monetary policy transmission in the euro area: what do aggregate and national structural models tell us?," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 433, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    7. Michael Sarel, 1996. "Nonlinear Effects of Inflation on Economic Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(1), pages 199-215, March.
    8. Fagan, Gabriel & Henry, Jerome & Mestre, Ricardo, 2005. "An area-wide model for the euro area," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 39-59, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Guglielmo Forges Davanzati, 2014. "Unemployment benefits, the 'added worker effect' and income distribution in a monetary economy," Working Papers PKWP1402, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
    2. Christophe Blot & Marion Cochard & Jérôme Creel & Bruno Ducoudré & Danielle Schweisguth & Xavier Timbeau, 2014. "Fiscal consolidation in times of crisis: is the sooner really the better?," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(1), pages 159-192.
    3. Jesús Ferreiro & M. Teresa García-del-Valle & Carmen Gómez, 2013. "An Analysis of the Convergence of the Composition of Public Expenditures in European Union Countries," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(4), pages 799-825, October.
    4. Forges Davanzati, Guglielmo & Pacella, Andrea, 2013. "The profits-investments puzzle: A Post Keynesian-Institutional interpretation," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 1-13.
    5. Giorgos Argitis, 2011. "A view on post-Keynesian interest rate policy," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 91-112.
    6. Philip Arestis, 2013. "Inflation Targeting: A Critical Approach," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, vol. 1(68), pages 7-21, June.
    7. Carrasco, Carlos A., 2013. "El Nuevo Consenso Macroeconómico y la mediocridad del crecimiento económico en México
      [New Consensus Macroeconomics and the mediocrity of economic growth in Mexico]
      ," MPRA Paper 53391, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/2g7mhju69b94obeaqlen09s1au is not listed on IDEAS

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