IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/mes/challe/v50y2007i1p21-39.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Why Europe Works Less and Grows Taller

Author

Listed:
  • Thorvaldur Gylfason

Abstract

How well is the United States really doing? Money isn't everything, says this economist. He takes a broader look at the standard of living in the United States compared to other rich nations and finds the United States lags in several key ways, including the fact that Europeans are now taller on average than Americans. Greater tolerance of inequality in the distribution of income and wealth in the United States than in Europe may have taken its toll.

Suggested Citation

  • Thorvaldur Gylfason, 2007. "Why Europe Works Less and Grows Taller," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(1), pages 21-39.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:challe:v:50:y:2007:i:1:p:21-39
    DOI: 10.2753/0577-5132500104
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2753/0577-5132500104
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alberto F. Alesina & Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote, 2006. "Work and Leisure in the U.S. and Europe: Why So Different?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2005, Volume 20, pages 1-100 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Edward C. Prescott, 2004. "Why do Americans work so much more than Europeans?," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Jul, pages 2-13.
    3. World Bank, 2005. "African Development Indicators 2005," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13111, July.
    4. World Bank, 2005. "World Development Indicators 2005," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12426, July.
    5. Olivier Blanchard, 2004. "The Economic Future of Europe," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(4), pages 3-26, Fall.
    6. repec:wbk:wbpubs:12425 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Richard H. Steckel, 1995. "Stature and the Standard of Living," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1903-1940, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Price, Gregory N., 2013. "The allometry of metabolism and stature: Worker fatigue and height in the Tanzanian labor market," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 515-521.
    2. Steckel, Richard H., 2009. "Heights and human welfare: Recent developments and new directions," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 1-23, January.
    3. Thorvaldur Gylfason, 2016. "Efficiency, Fairness, and Social Cohesion in Europe and the United States: Incomes, Hours of Work, and Equality with an Afterthought on Iceland," CESifo Working Paper Series 6025, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Jon D. Wisman & Kevin Capehart, 2009. "Creative Destruction, Economic Insecurity, Stress and Epidemic Obesity," Working Papers 2009-13 JEL classificatio, American University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mes:challe:v:50:y:2007:i:1:p:21-39. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/MCHA20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.