IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/rqfnac/v44y2015i3p551-572.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Informed trade and idiosyncratic return variation

Author

Listed:
  • Moonsoo Kang

    ()

  • Kiseok Nam

    ()

Abstract

This paper explores the role of private information on idiosyncratic return variation. We suggest that there is a significant positive relationship between informed trade and firm-specific return variation. Using the probability of information-based trading (PIN) as a measure of informed trade, we find that the PIN is positively related to idiosyncratic return variation in both the level and the first-difference. The results imply that firm-specific return variation is induced by informed trade through information flow on price formation. Especially, we find a strong interaction effect between informed trade and trading volume. The impact of informed trade on firm-specific return variation is more profound for stocks with a high trading volume than for stocks with a low trading volume. The result suggests that trading activity plays an important role in the information revelation. The results of various robustness checks confirm that informed trade is an important determinant of idiosyncratic return variation. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Moonsoo Kang & Kiseok Nam, 2015. "Informed trade and idiosyncratic return variation," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 551-572, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:rqfnac:v:44:y:2015:i:3:p:551-572
    DOI: 10.1007/s11156-013-0417-1
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11156-013-0417-1
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Y. Campbell, 2001. "Have Individual Stocks Become More Volatile? An Empirical Exploration of Idiosyncratic Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(1), pages 1-43, February.
    2. West, Kenneth D, 1988. "Dividend Innovations and Stock Price Volatility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(1), pages 37-61, January.
    3. Duarte, Jefferson & Young, Lance, 2009. "Why is PIN priced?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 119-138, February.
    4. David Easley & Soeren Hvidkjaer & Maureen O'Hara, 2002. "Is Information Risk a Determinant of Asset Returns?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(5), pages 2185-2221, October.
    5. Thierry Foucault & David Sraer & David J. Thesmar, 2011. "Individual Investors and Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(4), pages 1369-1406, August.
    6. Yexiao Xu & Burton G. Malkiel, 2003. "Investigating the Behavior of Idiosyncratic Volatility," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 76(4), pages 613-644, October.
    7. Jin, Li & Myers, Stewart C., 2006. "R2 around the world: New theory and new tests," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 257-292, February.
    8. Foster, F Douglas & Viswanathan, S, 1995. "Can Speculative Trading Explain the Volume-Volatility Relation?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(4), pages 379-396, October.
    9. Karpoff, Jonathan M., 1987. "The Relation between Price Changes and Trading Volume: A Survey," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(01), pages 109-126, March.
    10. Art Durnev & Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung, 2004. "Value-Enhancing Capital Budgeting and Firm-specific Stock Return Variation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(1), pages 65-105, February.
    11. Lei, Qin & Wu, Guojun, 2005. "Time-varying informed and uninformed trading activities," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 153-181, May.
    12. Simon Gervais, 2001. "The High-Volume Return Premium," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(3), pages 877-919, June.
    13. Glosten, Lawrence R. & Milgrom, Paul R., 1985. "Bid, ask and transaction prices in a specialist market with heterogeneously informed traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 71-100, March.
    14. Lee, Dong Wook & Liu, Mark H., 2011. "Does more information in stock price lead to greater or smaller idiosyncratic return volatility?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 1563-1580, June.
    15. Sreedhar T. Bharath & Paolo Pasquariello & Guojun Wu, 2009. "Does Asymmetric Information Drive Capital Structure Decisions?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(8), pages 3211-3243, August.
    16. David Easley & Robert F. Engle & Maureen O'Hara & Liuren Wu, 2008. "Time-Varying Arrival Rates of Informed and Uninformed Trades," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 6(2), pages 171-207, Spring.
    17. Miao Luo & Tao Chen & Isabel Yan, 2014. "Price informativeness and institutional ownership: evidence from Japan," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 42(4), pages 627-651, May.
    18. Lee, Charles M C & Ready, Mark J, 1991. " Inferring Trade Direction from Intraday Data," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(2), pages 733-746, June.
    19. Akay, Ozgur (Ozzy) & Cyree, Ken B. & Griffiths, Mark D. & Winters, Drew B., 2012. "What does PIN identify? Evidence from the T-bill market," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 29-46.
    20. Hwang, Lee-Seok & Lee, Woo-Jong & Lim, Seung-Yeon & Park, Kyung-Ho, 2013. "Does information risk affect the implied cost of equity capital? An analysis of PIN and adjusted PIN," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 148-167.
    21. Suominen, Matti, 2001. "Trading Volume and Information Revelation in Stock Market," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(04), pages 545-565, December.
    22. Dasgupta, Sudipto & Gan, Jie & Gao, Ning, 2010. "Transparency, Price Informativeness, and Stock Return Synchronicity: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(05), pages 1189-1220, October.
    23. Hutton, Amy P. & Marcus, Alan J. & Tehranian, Hassan, 2009. "Opaque financial reports, R2, and crash risk," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 67-86, October.
    24. Yan, Yuxing & Zhang, Shaojun, 2012. "An improved estimation method and empirical properties of the probability of informed trading," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 454-467.
    25. Brockman, Paul & Yan, Xuemin (Sterling), 2009. "Block ownership and firm-specific information," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 308-316, February.
    26. Amihud, Yakov, 2002. "Illiquidity and stock returns: cross-section and time-series effects," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 31-56, January.
    27. Artyom Durnev & Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung & Paul Zarowin, 2003. "Does Greater Firm-Specific Return Variation Mean More or Less Informed Stock Pricing?," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(5), pages 797-836, December.
    28. French, Kenneth R. & Roll, Richard, 1986. "Stock return variances : The arrival of information and the reaction of traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 5-26, September.
    29. William Lin, Hsiou-Wei & Ke, Wen-Chyan, 2011. "A computing bias in estimating the probability of informed trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 625-640, November.
    30. Kee Chung & Chairat Chuwonganant & D. McCormick, 2006. "Order preferencing, adverse-selection costs, and the probability of information-based trading," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 27(4), pages 343-364, December.
    31. Anthony Tay & Christopher Ting & Yiu Kuen Tse & Mitch Warachka, 2009. "Using High-Frequency Transaction Data to Estimate the Probability of Informed Trading," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 7(3), pages 288-311, Summer.
    32. repec:wsi:qjfxxx:v:04:y:2014:i:04:n:s2010139214500189 is not listed on IDEAS
    33. Steven Cahan & David Emanuel & Jerry Sun, 2009. "The effect of earnings quality and country-level institutions on the value relevance of earnings," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 371-391, November.
    34. Joel Hasbrouck, 2009. "Trading Costs and Returns for U.S. Equities: Estimating Effective Costs from Daily Data," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(3), pages 1445-1477, June.
    35. Patrick J. Kelly, 2014. "Information Efficiency and Firm-Specific Return Variation," Quarterly Journal of Finance (QJF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(04), pages 1-44.
    36. Fama, Eugene F & MacBeth, James D, 1973. "Risk, Return, and Equilibrium: Empirical Tests," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 607-636, May-June.
    37. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-1335, November.
    38. Michael Drew & Alastair Marsden & Madhu Veeraraghavan, 2004. "Idiosyncratic Volatility Matter? New Zealand Evidence," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 177, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    39. Andersen, Torben G, 1996. " Return Volatility and Trading Volume: An Information Flow Interpretation of Stochastic Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 51(1), pages 169-204, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:rqfnac:v:49:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11156-016-0586-9 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Price informativeness; Idiosyncratic return variation; Informed trade; R-square; Trading volume; Probability of information-based trading (PIN); G10; G14;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:rqfnac:v:44:y:2015:i:3:p:551-572. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.