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Does more information in stock price lead to greater or smaller idiosyncratic return volatility?

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  • Lee, Dong Wook
  • Liu, Mark H.

Abstract

We investigate the relation between price informativeness and idiosyncratic return volatility in a multi-asset, multi-period noisy rational expectations equilibrium. We show that the relation between price informativeness and idiosyncratic return volatility is either U-shaped or negative. Using several price informativeness measures, we empirically document a U-shaped relation between price informativeness and idiosyncratic return volatility. Our study therefore reconciles the opposing views in the following two strands of literature: (1) the growing body of research showing that firms with more informative stock prices have greater idiosyncratic return volatility, and (2) the studies arguing that more information in price reduces idiosyncratic return volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee, Dong Wook & Liu, Mark H., 2011. "Does more information in stock price lead to greater or smaller idiosyncratic return volatility?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 1563-1580, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:35:y:2011:i:6:p:1563-1580
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. repec:wsi:qjfxxx:v:04:y:2014:i:04:n:s2010139214500189 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David, Joel M. & Simonovska, Ina, 2016. "Correlated beliefs, returns, and stock market volatility," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(S1), pages 58-77.
    2. Pietro Perotti & Alfred Wagenhofer, 2014. "Earnings Quality Measures and Excess Returns," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(5-6), pages 545-571, June.
    3. De Cesari, Amedeo & Huang-Meier, Winifred, 2015. "Dividend changes and stock price informativeness," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 1-17.
    4. Zhu, PengCheng & Jog, Vijay & Otchere, Isaac, 2014. "Idiosyncratic volatility and mergers and acquisitions in emerging markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 18-48.
    5. Zhang, Wei & Li, Xiao & Shen, Dehua & Teglio, Andrea, 2016. "R2 and idiosyncratic volatility: Which captures the firm-specific return variation?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 298-304.
    6. repec:bla:acctfi:v:57:y:2017:i::p:3-43 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Jubinski, Daniel & Tomljanovich, Marc, 2013. "Do FOMC minutes matter to markets? An intraday analysis of FOMC minutes releases on individual equity volatility and returns," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 86-97.
    8. repec:wsi:qjfxxx:v:04:y:2014:i:04:n:s2010139214500189 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Patrick J. Kelly, 2014. "Information Efficiency and Firm-Specific Return Variation," Quarterly Journal of Finance (QJF), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(04), pages 1-44.
    10. Conghui Hu & Shasha Liu, 2013. "The Implications of Low R 2 : Evidence from China," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(1), pages 17-32, January.
    11. Moonsoo Kang & Kiseok Nam, 2015. "Informed trade and idiosyncratic return variation," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 551-572, April.
    12. Kee-Hong Bae & Jin-Mo Kim & Yang Ni, 2013. "Is Firm-specific Return Variation a Measure of Information Efficiency?," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 13(4), pages 407-445, December.
    13. repec:eee:phsmap:v:482:y:2017:i:c:p:621-626 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Conghui Hu & Shasha Liu, 2013. "The Implications of Low R 2 : Evidence from China," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(1), pages 17-32, January.
    15. Cheng, Louis T.W. & Leung, T.Y. & Yu, Wayne, 2014. "Information arrival, changes in R-square and pricing asymmetry of corporate news," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 67-81.

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