IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/revind/v43y2013i1p63-84.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Legacy of the Interstate Commerce Act and Labor: Legislation, Unionization, and Labor Earnings in Surface Transportation Services

Author

Listed:
  • James Peoples

    ()

Abstract

The intended purpose of the 1887 Interstate Commerce Act (ICA) was the establishment of the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) as a regulatory agency that initially provided oversight of rate and entry of interstate commerce in the rail industry. The ICC’s jurisdiction later included regulation of trucking and bus transportation. An unintended consequence of ICC regulation was the development of labor markets in these sectors that helped promote labor organization and labor rent sharing. Indeed, some of the most influential unions in American labor history represented workers in ICC-regulated industries. This study examines the ICA and its aftermath as it applies to labor in these industries. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Suggested Citation

  • James Peoples, 2013. "The Legacy of the Interstate Commerce Act and Labor: Legislation, Unionization, and Labor Earnings in Surface Transportation Services," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 43(1), pages 63-84, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:revind:v:43:y:2013:i:1:p:63-84
    DOI: 10.1007/s11151-013-9391-y
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11151-013-9391-y
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kevin E. Henrickson & Wesley W. Wilson, 2008. "Compensation, Unionization, and Deregulation in the Motor Carrier Industry," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(1), pages 153-177, February.
    2. James Peoples, 1998. "Deregulation and the Labor Market," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 111-130, Summer.
    3. Clifford Winston, 1998. "U.S. Industry Adjustment to Economic Deregulation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 89-110, Summer.
    4. Barry T. Hirsch, 1988. "Trucking Regulation, Unionization, and Labor Earnings: 1973-85," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(3), pages 296-319.
    5. Wilson, Wesley W, 1997. "Cost Savings and Productivity in the Railroad Industry," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 21-40, January.
    6. Barry T. Hirsch & Edward J. Schumacher, 2004. "Match Bias in Wage Gap Estimates Due to Earnings Imputation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(3), pages 689-722, July.
    7. David E. Davis & Wesley W. Wilson, 2003. "Wages in Rail Markets: Deregulation, Mergers, and Changing Networks Characteristics," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 69(4), pages 865-885, April.
    8. Marcus Alexis, 1982. "The applied theory of regulation: Political economy at the Interstate Commerce Commission," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 5-27, January.
    9. Ai, Chunrong & Norton, Edward C., 2000. "Standard errors for the retransformation problem with heteroscedasticity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 697-718, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. James Peoples, 2014. "Marcus Alexis and Regulatory Reform in Surface Transportation Industries," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 243-258, September.
    2. Richard L. Schmalensee & Wesley W. Wilson, 2016. "Modernizing U.S. Freight Rail Regulation," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 49(2), pages 133-159, September.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:revind:v:43:y:2013:i:1:p:63-84. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.