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LEGISLATING LOVE: The Effect of Child Support and Welfare Policies on Father–child Contact

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  • H. Elizabeth Peters
  • Laura Argys

    ()

  • Heather Howard
  • J. Butler

Abstract

Reducing non-marital childbearing and making nonresidential fathers take greater responsibility for their children were identified as goals of numerous policy changes since the 1980s. Child-support award rates for children born to unmarried parents have been quite low historically, leading lawmakers to focus on increasing both award and payment rates for this group. Nonmarital fathers are also much less likely to have contact with their children. Although evidence suggests that policy efforts increase child support awards and receipt, the link between child support policies, child support outcomes, and father-child contact has received less attention. This paper uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation on children born between 1985–1997 to investigate the relationship between child-support award and receipt and the amount of contact that fathers have with their non-residential children. Since it is likely that both of these behaviors are, in part, determined by unobservable characteristics of the father, we estimate an instrumental variables Tobit model. The model is identified by our assumption that child support policy variables can impact child support awards and payments, but father-child contact cannot be directly legislated. Our results suggest that there are unintended, but desirable effects of child support establishment and collection. Policies to collect child support not only increase financial resources to families, but through their impact on payments increase visitation and contact between these children and their fathers. The estimated impact of receiving child support on contact is more than 27 days per year. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Suggested Citation

  • H. Elizabeth Peters & Laura Argys & Heather Howard & J. Butler, 2004. "LEGISLATING LOVE: The Effect of Child Support and Welfare Policies on Father–child Contact," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 255-274, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:2:y:2004:i:3:p:255-274
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-004-5647-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hansen, Lars Peter, 1982. "Large Sample Properties of Generalized Method of Moments Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 1029-1054, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Huang, Chien-Chung & Han, Ke-Qing, 2012. "Child support enforcement in the United States: Has policy made a difference?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 622-627.
    2. Reagan A. Baughman, 2017. "The impact of child support on child health," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 69-91, March.
    3. Fisher, Hayley, 2015. "The Impact of Child Support Receipt on Household Income and Labour Supply," Working Papers 2015-20, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    4. repec:pri:crcwel:wp06-09-ff is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Lenna Nepomnyaschy & Irwin Garfinkel, 2007. "Child Support Enforcement and Fathers' Contributions to Their Nonmarital Children," Working Papers 909, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    6. Maya Rossin-Slater & Miriam Wüst, 2016. "Parental Responses to Child Support Obligations: Evidence from Administrative Data," NBER Working Papers 22227, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. repec:eee:cysrev:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:180-185 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:bla:ecorec:v:93:y:2017:i:301:p:189-213 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Berger, Lawrence M. & Cancian, Maria & Meyer, Daniel R., 2012. "Maternal re-partnering and new-partner fertility: Associations with nonresident father investments in children," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 426-436.

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