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Is the Austrian business cycle theory still relevant?

Author

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  • Anthony Carilli

    ()

  • Gregory Dempster

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Anthony Carilli & Gregory Dempster, 2008. "Is the Austrian business cycle theory still relevant?," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 21(4), pages 271-281, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:revaec:v:21:y:2008:i:4:p:271-281
    DOI: 10.1007/s11138-008-0044-6
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11138-008-0044-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Thomas Laubach & John C. Williams, 2003. "Measuring the Natural Rate of Interest," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 1063-1070, November.
    2. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-438, July.
    3. Lucas, Robert Jr, 1976. "Econometric policy evaluation: A critique," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 19-46, January.
    4. Hayek, F A, 1969. "Three Elucidations of the Ricardo Effect," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(2), pages 274-285, March/Apr.
    5. Wagner, Richard E, 1999. "Austrian Cycle Theory: Saving the Wheat While Discarding the Chaff," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 12(1), pages 65-80.
    6. White, Lawrence H, 1999. "Hayek's Monetary Theory and Policy: A Critical Reconstruction," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(1), pages 109-120, February.
    7. Keeler, James P, 2001. "Empirical Evidence on the Austrian Business Cycle Theory," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 14(4), pages 331-351, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Hoffmann, 2010. "An Overinvestment Cycle In Central And Eastern Europe?," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(4), pages 711-734, November.
    2. Martin Komrska & Marek Hudík, 2014. "Were Hayek?s Monetary Policy Recommendations Inconsistent?," Proceedings of Economics and Finance Conferences 0402133, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    3. Martin Komrska, 2015. "Rakouská teorie hospodářského cyklu: VAR analýza pro USA v letech 1978-2013
      [The Austrian Business Cycle Theory: VAR Analysis for USA between 1978-2013]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2015(1), pages 57-73.
    4. Martin Komrska & Marek Hudík, 2016. "Hayek’s monetary theory and policy: A note on alleged inconsistency," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 85-92, March.
    5. Nicolas Cachanosky, 2015. "Expectation in Austrian business cycle theory: Market share matters," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 151-165, June.
    6. William Luther & Mark Cohen, 2014. "An Empirical Analysis of the Austrian Business Cycle Theory," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 42(2), pages 153-169, June.
    7. David Howden, 2010. "Knowledge shifts and the business cycle: When boom turns to bust," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 165-182, June.
    8. repec:kap:revaec:v:30:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11138-016-0340-5 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business cycles; Natural rate of interest; Granger causality; VAR; PDL; C32; E32; E40;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General

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