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Public interest versus regulatory capture in the Swedish electricity market

  • Russell Smyth
  • Magnus Söderberg

    ()

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11149-010-9129-9
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Regulatory Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages: 292-312

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Handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:38:y:2010:i:3:p:292-312
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100298

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  1. Pushkar Maitra & Russell Smyth, 2004. "Judicial Independence, Judicial Promotion and the Enforcement of Legislative Wealth Transfers—An Empirical Study of the New Zealand High Court," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 209-235, March.
  2. Clare Leaver, 2009. "Bureaucratic Minimal Squawk Behavior: Theory and Evidence from Regulatory Agencies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 572-607, June.
  3. Johannes M. Bauer, 2005. "Regulation and state ownership: conflicts and complementarities in eu telecommunications," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 76(2), pages 151-177, 06.
  4. Salzberger, Eli & Fenn, Paul, 1999. "Judicial Independence: Some Evidence from the English Court of Appeal," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(2), pages 831-47, October.
  5. Peltzman, Sam, 1984. "Constituent Interest and Congressional Voting," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 181-210, April.
  6. Klein, Christopher C. & H. Sweeney, George, 1999. "Regulator preferences and utility prices: evidence from natural gas distribution utilities," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 1-15, February.
  7. Dal Bo, Ernesto & Rossi, Martin A., 2007. "Corruption and inefficiency: Theory and evidence from electric utilities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(5-6), pages 939-962, June.
  8. Antony Dnes, 1995. "Post-Privatization Performance-Regulating Telecommunications in the U.K : Testing for Regulatory Capture," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11647, The World Bank.
  9. Olson, Mary K, 1995. "Regulatory Agency Discretion among Competing Industries: Inside the FDA," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 379-405, October.
  10. Kalt, Joseph P & Zupan, Mark A, 1984. "Capture and Ideology in the Economic Theory of Politics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(3), pages 279-300, June.
  11. Antony W. Dnes & Jonathan S. Seaton, 1999. "The Regulation of British Telecom: An Event Study," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 155(4), pages 610-, December.
  12. Christopher R. Knittel, 2003. "Market Structure and the Pricing of Electricity and Natural Gas," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 167-191, 06.
  13. Nelson, Randy A, 1982. "An Empirical Test of the Ramsey Theory and Stigler-Peltzman Theory of Public Utility Pricing," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(2), pages 277-90, April.
  14. Martimort, David, 1999. "The Life Cycle of Regulatory Agencies: Dynamic Capture and Transaction Costs," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(4), pages 929-47, October.
  15. Tooraj Jamasb & Magnus Söderberg, 2010. "The Effects of Average Norm Model Regulation: The Case of Electricity Distribution in Sweden," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 249-269, May.
  16. Geoff Edwards & Leonard Waverman, 2006. "The Effects of Public Ownership and Regulatory Independence on Regulatory Outcomes," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 23-67, 01.
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