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Environmental Externalities in the Presence of Network Effects: Adoption of Low Emission Technologies in the Automobile Market

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  • Eftichios Sartzetakis

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  • Panagiotis Tsigaris

Abstract

The paper considers a market currently dominated by a dirty technology that imposes significant environmental costs. A clean technology, with zero environmental costs, is introduced after the maturity of the dirty technology’s network. Adoption of the clean technology is not possible due to the network benefits in favour of the dirty technology. The paper considers two types of policy intervention to correct for the environmental externality. First, we find that the tax necessary to induce adoption of the clean technology is very high implying that a tax equal to the marginal environmental damage would not resolve the externality problem in many cases. Second, if tax revenues are earmarked towards subsidizing the clean technology, the tax is lower than in the previous case and can be set equal to the marginal external damage. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Eftichios Sartzetakis & Panagiotis Tsigaris, 2005. "Environmental Externalities in the Presence of Network Effects: Adoption of Low Emission Technologies in the Automobile Market," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 309-326, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:28:y:2005:i:3:p:309-326
    DOI: 10.1007/s11149-005-3961-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Foreman-Peck,, 1996. "'Technological Lock-in' and the Power Source for the Motor Car," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _007, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mads Greaker & Kristoffer Midttømme, 2014. "Optimal Environmental Policy with Network Effects: Will Pigovian Taxation Lead to Excess Inertia?," CESifo Working Paper Series 4759, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Slivko, Olga, 2012. "Direct and indirect subsidies in markets with system goods in the presence of externalities. Preliminary version," Working Papers 2072/211631, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    3. Greaker, Mads & Midttømme, Kristoffer, 2016. "Network effects and environmental externalities: Do clean technologies suffer from excess inertia?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 27-38.
    4. Dietrich, Antje-Mareike, 2017. "Platform intermediation to sponsor alternative fuel vehicles," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 90-99.
    5. Dietrich, Antje-Mareike, 2016. "Governmental platform intermediation to promote alternative fuel vehicles," Economics Department Working Paper Series 16, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Economics Department.
    6. Antje-Mareike Dietrich & Gernot Sieg, 2014. "Welfare Effects of Subsidizing a Dead-End Network of Less Polluting Vehicles," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 335-355, December.
    7. Perdiguero, Jordi & Jiménez, Juan Luis, 2011. "Sell or not sell biodiesel: Local competition and government measures," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 1525-1532, April.
    8. Greaker, Mads & Midttømme, Kristoffer, 2013. "Optimal Environmental Policy with Network Effects: Is Lock-in in Dirty Technologies Possible?," Memorandum 15/2013, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

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